Gingrich denies interest in Trump role
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Former Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) says he has not talked to Donald TrumpDonald TrumpScarborough links Trump rhetoric, candidate's alleged assault of reporter Trump was smart to abandon NAFTA war, now let’s improve trade 5 things to watch in Montana’s special election MORE about serving in a potential Trump administration despite growing speculation about an alliance between the two men.
  
"I wouldn't have such a conversation," the Georgia Republican told The Hill in a telephone interview on Tuesday. 
 
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"I am not interested in such a conversation. I am having a great time doing a lot of fun things. It wouldn't be appropriate at this stage [to discuss administration roles]. He's gotta finish winning the nomination and then beat Hillary [Clinton]." 
 
Gingrich, who ran for president in 2012 and was the architect of the Republican House takeover in the 1990s, has praised and defended Trump during the businessman's meteoric political rise. He has made public statements defending the front-runner and was in the room on Monday when Trump huddled with GOP lawmakers in Washington.
 
The former Speaker told The Hill that, while he offers private advice to the billionaire, he is unsure of how useful he has been to a candidate who "operates with enormous intuition."
 
"I think first of all, Trump is his own strategic brain," he said. "While he listens to many people I don't think in the traditional sense that he has any one adviser that's decisive in what he's doing."
 
Gingrich said he would not discuss his private conversations with Trump, saying that doing so "violates the whole point of private advice." 
 
But sources familiar with the conversations say that Trump and Gingrich have a closer personal relationship than is widely understood.
 
The former Speaker says he has known Trump for a long time.
 
"When I have got ideas, I try to give them to him. ... But I try to do the same for the others."
 
"I have always taken a position that I am happy to advise people," he said, adding that he has spoken with other GOP presidential hopefuls as well. "I went to John Kasich's town hall meeting in Arlington and I've talked to [Ted] Cruz a couple of times on the phone."
 
"I see my role being a senior adviser and friend to these guys." 
 
But Gingrich also questions the utility of his advice to a political novice who has defied every lesson Gingrich has internalized over his long career in public life. 
 
"[Trump] did ask me my advice some time and I said I couldn't possibly give him advice because all of the patterns I operate off" have already been inverted by the celebrity businessman, Gingrich said.
 
Asked to characterize the GOP front-runner's relationship with Gingrich, Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski said, "He's one of many different people who give Mr. Trump advice and counsel. It would be unfair to single any one person out."
 
"I think what you find with Mr. Trump is he's a person who has an ability to very quickly take information from experts in the field and synthesize that information to make a quick and informed decision," Lewandowski told The Hill in a telephone interview on Tuesday. 
 
"What that means is that on areas like national defense, national security and homeland security, he solicits information from a lot of different sources but at the end of the day like any great leader he makes the ultimate decision."
 
Trump has been reluctant to name his advisers. He was mocked last week by Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonRussia-linked attack targets government officials, journalists, activists 5 things to watch in Montana’s special election Hannity on attempted advertiser boycott: 'Nobody tells me what to say on my show' MORE's super-PAC for telling MSNBC's "Morning Joe" that when it comes to foreign policy advice, "I’m speaking with myself, number one, because I have a very good brain, and I’ve said a lot of things.”
 
But on Monday, Trump broke with tradition by releasing a list of his foreign policy and national security advisers, and he followed that disclosure with an uncharacteristically scripted speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee conference in Washington.
 
Gingrich believes Trump is operating perfectly fine without traditional advisers and says it would be "gross exaggeration" to describe himself as a key adviser to the billionaire. 
 
The Republican insists his own plans are creative, not political. Gingrich says he is finishing a movie on George Washington and is thinking of making a movie about Thomas Jefferson. He is also writing a novel called "Treason" that deals with Islamic extremism.
 
"I have no interest in taking a full-time job anywhere."