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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpWSJ: Trump ignored advice to confront Putin over indictments Trump hotel charging Sean Spicer ,000 as book party venue Bernie Sanders: Trump 'so tough' on child separations but not on Putin MORE had a tepid response when asked if he would consider GOP presidential rival Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWashington needs to end hidden inflation tax on our capital gains GOP tax writer introduces bill to reduce capital gains taxes Senators push to clear backlog in testing rape kits MORE for the Supreme Court should the businessman win the White House.

"I don't know, I'd have to think about it," Trump told the Daily Mail in an interview Monday.

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"There's a whole question of uniting and there's a whole question as to temperament," Trump continued. "He's certainly a smart guy, but there's also a temperament issue."

"He's got a tough temperament for what we're talking about," Trump said. "You have to be a very, very smart, rational person, in my opinion, to be a justice of any kind."

Trump told The Washington Post that he plans to announce upward of a dozen judges from which he'd pick to fill Supreme Court vacancies. 

Cruz, a former Texas solicitor general, has been mentioned by Republicans as a potential replacement to fill the vacant seat previously held by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidSenate GOP breaks record on confirming Trump picks for key court Don’t worry (too much) about Kavanaugh changing the Supreme Court Dem infighting erupts over Supreme Court pick MORE (D-Nev.) on Monday described such a scenario as scary.

For his part, Cruz insisted in March that he was more focused on nominating justices to the court than becoming one.

Trump made his comments to the Mail as he and Cruz battle in Indiana heading into the state's primary on Tuesday. The Hoosier State is viewed as a last chance for Cruz and fellow candidate John Kasich to prevent Trump from reaching the 1,237 delegates needed to secure the nomination before the Republican National Convention in July.