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Donald TrumpDonald TrumpOvernight Cybersecurity: DOJ takes down two online criminal markets | Kansas breach exposed 5M Social Security numbers OPINION | Trump's chaos, mixed messages more dangerous than his policies   Special counsel looking into possible money laundering by Manafort: report MORE had a tepid response when asked if he would consider GOP presidential rival Ted CruzTed CruzCruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power Overnight Finance: GOP offers measure to repeal arbitration rule | Feds fine Exxon M for Russian sanctions violations | Senate panel sticks with 2017 funding levels for budget | Trump tax nominee advances | Trump unveils first reg agenda The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE for the Supreme Court should the businessman win the White House.

"I don't know, I'd have to think about it," Trump told the Daily Mail in an interview Monday.

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"There's a whole question of uniting and there's a whole question as to temperament," Trump continued. "He's certainly a smart guy, but there's also a temperament issue."

"He's got a tough temperament for what we're talking about," Trump said. "You have to be a very, very smart, rational person, in my opinion, to be a justice of any kind."

Trump told The Washington Post that he plans to announce upward of a dozen judges from which he'd pick to fill Supreme Court vacancies. 

Cruz, a former Texas solicitor general, has been mentioned by Republicans as a potential replacement to fill the vacant seat previously held by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidConservative Senate candidate calls on GOP to end filibuster Ex-Reid aide: McConnell's 'original sin' was casting ObamaCare as 'partisan, socialist takeover' GOP faces growing demographic nightmare in West MORE (D-Nev.) on Monday described such a scenario as scary.

For his part, Cruz insisted in March that he was more focused on nominating justices to the court than becoming one.

Trump made his comments to the Mail as he and Cruz battle in Indiana heading into the state's primary on Tuesday. The Hoosier State is viewed as a last chance for Cruz and fellow candidate John Kasich to prevent Trump from reaching the 1,237 delegates needed to secure the nomination before the Republican National Convention in July.