Trump overtakes Clinton in poll average for first time
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Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Trump Jr. declines further Secret Service protection: report Report: Mueller warned Manafort to expect an indictment MORE has overtaken Democratic front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax hit by earlier hack | What to know about Kaspersky controversy | Officials review EU-US privacy pact Overnight Tech: Equifax hit by earlier undisclosed hack | Facebook takes heat over Russian ads | Alt-right Twitter rival may lose domain MORE in an average of head-to-head national polls, according to the RealClearPolitics average of polls.

Trump leads Clinton by 0.2 percentage points, 43.4 percent to 43.2 percent in the average, overtaking the Democratic front-runner for the first time in the average of polls.

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Several recent surveys have shown Trump with an advantage over Clinton.

An ABC News/Washington Post poll conducted May 16–19 shows a tight race between the two candidates, with Trump holding a 2-point lead over Clinton. A Rasmussen Reports poll conducted May 17–18 had the presumptive GOP nominee up 5 points over Clinton. A recent Fox News poll also showed Trump with a lead.

Clinton's lead over Trump has been decreasing over the past several weeks, according to the RealClearPolitics average of polls.

Trump has, in recent weeks, started to pivot toward the general election after his two former rivals dropped their presidential bids following the Indiana primary. 

Clinton's rival, Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Dems fear lasting damage from Clinton-Sanders fight MORE, has vowed to remain in the race until the primaries wrap up, although Clinton has a large delegate lead over the Vermont senator.