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Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonPoll: 85 percent of Clinton supporters would vote for her again OMB director: Government shutdown not a 'desired end' Poll: Almost half say Trump off to poor start MORE and Donald TrumpDonald TrumpFrench election: Le Pen, Macron ahead in early results Trump: Government 'involves heart,' unlike business Issa dodges when asked if he wants Trump to campaign alongside him MORE are in a dead heat in the battleground state of Ohio, according to a new poll released Thursday.

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The Suffolk University survey found Clinton and Trump tied at 44 percent, with 11 percent of likely voters still undecided.

When the race is a four-way contest with Libertarian nominee Gary JohnsonGary JohnsonPoll: 85 percent of Clinton supporters would vote for her again Open primaries are the answer to America’s election woes — so what are we waiting for? Trump’s early economic success reveals Obama failures, could presage 2020 landslide MORE and presumptive Green Party nominee Jill Stein, Clinton leads Trump by 4 points, 43 percent to 39 percent. Johnson gets 5 percent, Stein receives 1 percent, and 12 percent are undecided.

The survey was released on the last day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, hours before Trump will officially accept the GOP presidential nomination.

Trump and Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee, both have negative favorability ratings. Clinton is viewed favorably by 41 percent and unfavorably by 51 percent, and Trump 38 percent favorable to 53 percent unfavorable.

“These largely negative views of the candidates come despite heavy Clinton campaign advertising in Ohio leading up to the Republican Convention and Trump’s efforts to humanize his candidacy with multiple prime-time speeches from family members,” said David Paleologos, director of the Suffolk University Political Research Center.

“The Ohio-based Republican convention might have been expected to give Trump a bump among that state’s voters, yet their dislike of both major-party candidates is translating into unease about the upcoming election,” Paleologos added.

The poll was conducted from July 18 to 20 and surveyed 500 likely Ohio voters via phone. The margin of error was 4.4 points.