Pence: Trump will ‘end the war on coal’
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Gov. Mike PenceMike (Michael) Richard PencePence records robocall for GOP candidate ahead of Montana special election Pence to give speech Wednesday in Louisiana Report: US begins 'extreme vetting' in Australia refugee camps MORE (R-Ind.) on Monday said his running mate, Donald TrumpDonald TrumpDavid Letterman: ‘Makes me sick’ that Trump represents us Warren rips Trump’s proposed budget cuts to Social Security Trump called Kim Jong Un a ‘madman with nuclear weapons’: report MORE, will not undermine the coal industry should he become president.

“Donald Trump is going to end the war on coal on Day 1 of his administration,” he said during a campaign stop in Sioux City, Iowa, on Monday evening. "We’re going to free up coal production in this country for the American people.”

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Pence, the Republican Party's vice presidential nominee, said Trump is much more receptive to fossil fuels than Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonTrump’s crisis of legitimacy Hannity on Seth Rich coverage: ‘I retracted nothing’ Pavlich: Politicizing the FBI MORE.

“Hillary Clinton wants to reduce the use of fossil fuels. We’re going to have an all-of-the-above energy strategy under President Trump.”

Pence said Trump’s admiration for blue-collar voters guides the billionaire's economic agenda.

“While he’s led a global business and built skyscrapers to the clouds, he’s done it shoulder-to-shoulder with the men who have done the work,” he said.

"He’s spent as much time talking to the people grooming the lawns and laying the bricks as he has to other CEOs.”

Pence also said a cornerstone of Trump’s economic vision includes revamping the nation’s outdated infrastructure.

“In America we do three things particularly well: we make things, we grow things and we move things. We’ve got to continue to invest in our infrastructure in this country.”

Pence additionally vowed that Trump would give America a fresh start after two terms of President Obama’s policies.

“This is really a very simple choice,” he said of the White House contenders. “It’s a choice between change and the status quo. At the very moment America is crying out for something different, the other party has nominated the most familiar of names with a stale agenda."