Boxing promoter Don King appealed to white women to vote for Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpSasse: Trump shouldn't dignify Putin with Helsinki summit Top LGBT group projects message onto Presidential Palace in Helsinki ahead of Trump-Putin summit Hillary Clinton to Trump ahead of Putin summit: 'Do you know which team you play for?' MORE, telling them at an African-American church in Cleveland that the Republican presidential nominee believes in "inclusiveness."

"When the system was created ... the white woman did not have the rights, and she still don't have the rights. And people of color don't have their rights. ... Donald Trump says no, we're going back to inclusiveness. Everybody counts. Every white woman should cast their vote for Donald Trump."

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King's appeal to female voters comes as Trump seeks to close the gap among this voter bloc, which has largely flocked to Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary Clinton to Trump ahead of Putin summit: 'Do you know which team you play for?' 10 things we learned from Peter Strzok's congressional testimony Get ready for summit with no agenda and calculated risks MORE.

King introduced Trump at a church in King’s hometown of Cleveland, making the case that “the system is the enemy,” not the GOP nominee.

“Why would I undertake the task ... and distinct honor to present to you the next president of the United States is because he’s fearless. He’s courageous and brave and bold enough to take on the system,” King said.

King argued that the real estate mogul is the only presidential candidate who can rebuild government, calling him a champion of all people, particularly African-Americans.

“He’s the only man in hundreds of years that has the consensus of public opinion of rejection to the form of government,” King said. “The system is corrupt; the system is rigged; the system is sexist; the system is racist.”

“He’s the only gladiator to take out the system ... and create a new system,” King continued. “We need Donald Trump — especially black people.”

King accidentally slipped in the n-word while making his appeal to black voters.

"They told me you have to try to emulate and imitate the white man and then you can be successful, so we tried that," King said. "I told Michael Jackson, if you’re poor, you’re a poor negro ... I would use the n-word."

He continued with the example and used the word this time before correcting himself, to laughter from the audience.

"If you’re a dancing, sliding, gliding n----r, I mean negro, you’re a dancing, sliding and gliding negro 'til you die. So dare not alienate because you cannot assimilate."

King also gave a shoutout to Trump's father, Fred Trump, who he said was "smiling down" on the Republican businessman. In the early 1970s, the Justice Department accused the Trump family of discriminating against black tenants in New York, according to reports.

King will join Trump at other Ohio campaign stops in Toledo and Dayton.

The boxing promoter's endorsement of Trump has caused a stir given his conviction in 1966 for non-negligent manslaughter in the death of one of his employees. He served four years in prison and was pardoned by the governor of Ohio in 1983 after his release.