Trump slams Obama for ‘shameful’ 9/11 bill veto
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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpIran claims it rejected Trump meeting requests 8 times ESPY host jokes Putin was as happy after Trump summit as Ovechkin winning Stanley Cup Russian ambassador: Trump made ‘verbal agreements’ with Putin MORE on Friday blasted President Obama for vetoing legislation that would allow families of 9/11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia in U.S. courts.

“President Obama’s veto of the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act is shameful and will go down as one of the low points of his presidency,” he said in a statement.

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“This bipartisan legislation was passed unanimously by both houses of Congress and would have allowed the families of the nearly 3,000 people slaughtered by radical Islamic terrorists on September 11, 2001, the opportunity to seek justice in an American court of law.”

Trump added he would approve the controversial legislation if he were occupying the White House instead of Obama.

“That President Obama would deny the parents, spouses, and children of those we lost on that horrific day the chance to close this painful chapter in their lives is a disgrace,” the GOP’s presidential nominee said.

“These are wonderful people, and as a lifelong New Yorker, I am saddened that they will, for now, not have that opportunity. If elected president, I would sign such legislation should it reach my desk."

Obama vetoed JASTA earlier Friday, setting the stage for a fierce showdown with Congress over its future. 

“I recognize that there is nothing that could ever erase the grief that 9/11 families have endured,” he wrote in his veto message. 

“Enacting JASTA into law, however, would neither protect Americans from terrorist attacks nor improve the effectiveness of our response to such attacks.”

JASTA would allow those injured or families of the deceased from the 9/11 terrorist attacks to sue foreign governments using the U.S. court system. 

Saudi Arabia has long been accused of supporting the hijackers – charges which Saudi leadership strongly denies.

Obama maintains JASTA would undermine decades-old diplomatic immunity protections guaranteed by a 1976 law and complicate the U.S.' foreign policy goals and alliances.

But JASTA enjoys overwhelming bipartisan support in both chambers of Congress.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate GOP breaks record on confirming Trump picks for key court Senate Democrats block resolution supporting ICE The Hill's Morning Report — Trump’s walk-back fails to stem outrage on Putin meeting MORE (R-K.Y.) said earlier this week the upper chamber will delay a recess in order to vote on overriding the veto. 

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanWhy the rush to condemn a carbon tax? House votes to go to conference on farm bill House backs resolution expressing support for ICE MORE (R-Wis.) said the House will follow suit, predicting “the votes are there for an override.” 

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonState Dept: Russia’s allegations about American citizens ‘absolutely absurd’ Trump on possible sit-down with Mueller: 'I've always wanted to do an interview' Election Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas MORE’s presidential campaign additionally announced Friday the Democratic presidential nominee would sign JASTA.

“Clinton continues to support the efforts by Sen. [Chuck] Schumer [D-N.Y.] and his colleagues in the Congress to secure the ability of 9/11 families and other victims of terror to hold accountable those responsible,” spokesman Jesse Lehrich said.  “She would sign this legislation if it came to her desk.”