Indiana Gov. Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceAnti-Maduro Venezuelans not unlike anti-Castro Cubans of yore Congress is still doing nothing to save Christians in the Middle East Liberal students, colleges should learn from Liberty University's civility MORE (R) on Sunday defended Republican presidential nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Memo: Will Mueller play hardball with Trump? Mexican presidential candidate vows to fire back at Trump's 'offensive' tweets Elizabeth Warren urges grads to fight for 'what is decent' in current political climate MORE's call for an expanded use of the controversial stop-and-frisk policing program.

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"Stop-and-frisk literally saved lives in New York City when it was implemented, and it's been implemented in cities around the country," Pence said on "Fox News Sunday."

"It's on a sound constitutional footing. This gives law enforcement officers the opportunity, with probable cause, to be able to stop and question individuals that they think may be involved or about to be involved in criminal activity."

Trump last week called for using the stop-and-frisk policy when asked at a town hall about how he would address violence in black communities.

The GOP nominee said policies have to be "proactive" and noted the policy worked "incredibly well" in New York City.

“Now, we had a very good mayor, but New York City was incredible, the way that worked, so I think that could be one step you could do,” Trump said.

Pence, the Republican vice presidential nominee, said Sunday that Trump was specifically talking about the "crisis of criminality and murder in Chicago."

"Donald Trump is the kind of leader that's going to say, 'Look, let's take a policy that worked in New York City, that reduced violent crime in New York City, stop-and-frisk, and bring it to Chicago, Ill.,' " Pence said.

"And that's just the kind of leadership he's going to continue."

Trump for years has been an advocate of the controversial policy, which allows police officers to stop and search people if they have a reasonable suspicion that the person committed a crime.