Sanders: I'll stay in 'until the last vote is counted'
© Greg Nash

Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersMellman: On Political Authenticity (Part 2) Former Sanders campaign manager: Don't expect email list to be shared with DNC Adult film star: Trump and Stormy Daniels invited me to 'hang out' MORE said he will stay in the race “until the last vote is counted."

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“Well, we’re going to stay in until the last vote is counted, and that will be in the primary in Washington, D.C.,” Sanders told NPR’s "Morning Edition" in an interview aired Thursday.

Sanders trails front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonIntel Dem decries White House 'gag order' after Bannon testimony 'Total free-for-all' as Bannon clashes with Intel members Mellman: On Political Authenticity (Part 2) MORE among delegates and superdelegates and would need landslide victories in the remaining primary states to grab the nomination from the front-runner.

He has admitted his path toward victory has become “narrow” but points to upset victories in states like Indiana on Tuesday as proof of his momentum.

“I think we’ve got some good victories coming. So we are in this race until the very last vote is cast,” Sanders said. “The path to victory is to do extremely well in the remaining states and as you indicate, California, of course, is the largest state and we hope to do very well there and win that state.”

Clinton currently leads in delegate-rich California by 10 percentage points, according to a RealClearPolitics average of polls

Clinton has 1,683 pledged delegates to Sanders’s 1,362, according to The Associated Press. Clinton’s lead grows substantially when superdelegates are factored in. She has 522 superdelegates to Sanders’s 39, according to the AP. Democrats need 2,383 delegates to clinch the nomination.

Sanders also told NPR that he will continue to try to flip superdelegates supporting Clinton.

At a press conference last Sunday, Sanders called himself the best candidate to defeat presumptive GOP nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDems flip Wisconsin state Senate seat Sessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants GOP rep: 'Sheet metal and garbage' everywhere in Haiti MORE.

“I think that in those states where we have won landslide victories, those delegates should reflect the wishes of the people in their state and give us their vote,” Sanders said.

“And then I think we have got to make the case that the superdelegates, who are in many cases, were on board for Hillary Clinton even before I got in the race, that they should take a hard look at which candidate is stronger against Donald Trump. And I think we can make that case.”