Republican presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump pens op-ed on kindergartners learning tech Bharara, Yates tamp down expectations Mueller will bring criminal charges Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax security employee left after breach | Lawmakers float bill to reform warrantless surveillance | Intel leaders keeping collusion probe open MORE holds a 7-point lead over rival Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWhatever you think the Alabama special election means, you’re probably wrong This week: Congress gets ball rolling on tax reform Week ahead: Senators work toward deal to fix ObamaCare markets MORE in Iowa, fueled by first-time GOP caucusgoers, according to a new poll.

Trump leads Cruz, 31 to 24 percent, in the Quinnipiac poll released Monday morning.

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Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense: Tillerson, Trump deny report of rift | Tillerson says he never considered resigning | Trump expresses 'total confidence' in secretary | Rubio asks Army to kick out West Point grad Rubio asks Army to kick out West Point grad with pro-communist posts GOP establishment doubts Bannon’s primary powers MORE has 17 percent, while no other GOP candidate has double-digit support, with Ben Carson the closest, at 8 percent. 

Trump has edged past Cruz in the Hawkeye State over the past few weeks but on Monday shied away from predicting a win over his GOP rivals.
 
Trump's rise in the Quinnipiac poll is boosted by first-time Iowa voters: 40 percent say they will support him, compared with 22 percent for Cruz. 
 
Among first-time voters, Sanders holds a major lead over Clinton, 62 to 35 percent, while Clinton holds a 9-point lead among those who have caucused before.

Martin O’Malley has 3 percent support in the Hawkeye State.

Attention in the 2016 cycle has been largely dominated by political outsiders, and pollsters predict high turnout could boost Trump and Sanders, who have positioned themselves as such.
 
The survey of 890 likely GOP caucusgoers and 919 likely Democratic caucusgoers was conducted Jan. 25–31 via landlines and cellphones with a margin of error of 3.3 points for Republicans and 3.2 points for Democrats.