Third-party candidates on outside as debate criteria released
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The Commission on Presidential Debates has released the polls it will use to decide the participants of September's first presidential debate as third-party candidates struggle to make the stage.  

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Candidates will need to hit an average of 15 percent in polls conducted by ABC/Washington Post, CBS/New York Times, CNN/Opinion Research Corporation, Fox News, and NBC/Wall Street Journal. The 15 percent threshold had been announced months ago, but the commission released its polling selections on Monday after consultation with Frank Newport, the editor-in-chief of Gallup. 
 
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE and Republican nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Democrat slams Donald Trump Jr. for ‘serious case of amnesia’ after testimony Skier Lindsey Vonn: I don’t want to represent Trump at Olympics Poll: 4 in 10 Republicans think senior Trump advisers had improper dealings with Russia MORE are virtually assured a slot each on the stage for the Sept. 26 debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. But it remains unlikely that a third-party candidate will join them, despite voters' historic dislike of both Clinton and Trump. 
 
 
Johnson currently averages 9 percent in the three most recent qualifying polls, while Stein sits at just under 5 percent. In Fox's most recent poll, Johnson scored 12 percent, but the poll did not include Stein. CBS did not test either candidate in its most recent poll. 
 
A representative with the commission did not immediately respond to a request as to how the criteria would be applied if Fox and CBS continued not to test the whole field. 
 
A representative with the commission told The Hill that the polling averages only include the polls where a candidate is tested. So that means Johnson and Stein would not be penalized for polls they were not included in, outside of having fewer opportunities to raise their averages.