Angle says advisers suggested she look 'more serious'

In an interview over the weekend with the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Republican Senate nominee Sharron Angle said some of her political advisers have suggested she look more serious for TV interviews.   

Angle is trying to unseat Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.). 

Although Angle said she has softened some of her rhetoric on the trail, she denied her campaign has had a political makeover. 

"I'm not made over," Angle told the LVRJ. "There are people who would like to see different things come out of me, but I am who I am." From the paper:   

"Some people do say, 'Don't smile so much,'" Angle said, breaking out into laughter. "I don't know how to do that. This is me."

More seriously, Angle's critics have accused the Tea Party favorite of undergoing a political makeover since her June 8 GOP primary victory to appeal to moderates and independents in the general election. 

For example, she relaunched her website after scrubbing it of her more controversial positions, such as eliminating the Education Department and developing Yucca Mountain as a nuclear reprocessing site. The Reid campaign has accused her of trying to hide from her old positions.

Angle, during a 10-minute interview on the sidelines of the Nevada Republican Party Convention, said she still believes in those things, which she says will help cut federal spending and create jobs.

On the hiring of Republican media consultant John Brabender, Angle said it only came after receiving assurances that he wouldn't try to change her — the same approach Brabender said he took with Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.):

"John told me, 'What I realized about Tom is I have to let Tom be Tom,' and we said, 'Bingo, you're our man,'" Angle said. "So the person we brought on board was a person who said, 'I'm going to let Sharron Angle be Sharron Angle.'"

Still, Angle acknowledged she has toned down her words after being pummeled for saying things such as wanting to "take out" Harry Reid in the same breath that she mentions that people angry at government have "Second Amendment remedies" available, or the right to bear arms.