At least eight of the 36 GOP "no" votes came from members thought to be running for the Senate or other higher office in two years, including Rep. Mike Pence (Ind.), a potential GOP presidential hopeful. Check out the full roll call here.

Also voting against the compromise, which passed the House overwhelmingly Thursday, were Reps. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzTucker Carlson: Ruling class cares more about foreigners than their own people Fox's Kennedy chides Chaffetz on child migrants: 'I’m sure these mini rapists all have bombs strapped to their chests' After FBI cleared by IG report, GOP must reform itself MORE (R-Utah), Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.), Connie Mack (R-Fla.), Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannYes, condemn Roseanne, but ignoring others is true hypocrisy Bachmann won't run for Franken's Senate seat because she did not hear a 'call from God' Billboard from ‘God’ tells Michele Bachmann not to run for Senate MORE (R-Minn.) and Pete Hoekstra (R-Mich.).

Chaffetz is making noise about challenging Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchGOP lambasts Trump over performance in Helsinki Senate panel to vote Thursday on Trump's pick to lead IRS Romney: Trump's remarks at Putin summit 'disgraceful and detrimental to democratic principles' MORE (R-Utah) in a GOP primary in 2012. Hatch voted for the package in Wednesday's 81-19 Senate vote.

The votes against the measure, which is now headed to the president's desk, will likely be a positive with Tea Party activists and could help in a GOP primary.

Rehberg, Mack, Bachmann and Hoekstra are all mentioned as potential Senate candidates in 2012. Incumbent Democratic Sens. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusJudge boots Green Party from Montana ballot in boost to Tester Clients’ Cohen ties become PR liability Green Party puts Dem seat at risk in Montana MORE (Mont.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonSenate Dems rip Trump after Putin news conference Senate Dems lock in million in TV airtime Doug Jones walks tightrope on Supreme Court nominee MORE (Fla.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharBooker seizes on Kavanaugh confirmation fight Democrats build abortion case against Kavanaugh  The animating forces behind the Democratic Party are true, radical leftists MORE (Minn.) and Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump, Putin meet under cloud of Mueller’s Russia indictments Dem senator: Kavanaugh sides with 'wealthiest special interests' Judge on Trump shortlist boasts stint on Michigan's high court MORE (Mich.) all supported the package.

Though Republican leaders in the House and Senate supported the package, some conservatives have derided the compromise, taking issue with the way in which the extension of unemployment insurance benefits will be paid for. Conservatives who have wanted to eliminate the estate tax have also raised objections to that part of the deal.

Two other members who have been urged to run for the Senate by some Republicans in their home states — Reps. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) and Jeff FortenberryJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FortenberryFortenberry named chairman of legislative appropriations subcommittee in House The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Tensions mount for House Republicans Koch-backed group to target some Republicans over spending vote in new ad campaign MORE (R-Neb.) — also voted against the compromise Thursday. But Jordan has all but ruled out a run against Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSenate Dems tell Trump: Don't meet with Putin one-on-one On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump walks back criticism of UK Brexit strategy | McConnell worries US in 'early stages' of trade war | US trade deficit with China hits new record Blueprint to Lower Drug Prices could offer a way forward in fight against mushrooming costs MORE (D-Ohio) in 2012, and Fortenberry has shown little public interest so far in challenging Sen. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.).

One other interesting note: Rep. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerJacky Rosen hits Dean Heller over health care in first negative ad GOP moderates hint at smooth confirmation ahead for Kavanaugh GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE MORE (R-Nev.) voted for the tax deal in the House, breaking with Sen. John Ensign (Nev.), who was one of the few Republicans to vote against the compromise in the Senate.

Heller is a rumored Senate contender in 2012, and many think he's likely to run regardless of whether the scandal-plagued Ensign decides to seek another term.

Despite the uproar on the left over the deal, it passed the House with ease Thursday by a vote of 277-148, winning the votes of 139 House Democrats.

This story was updated at 9:03 a.m.