At least eight of the 36 GOP "no" votes came from members thought to be running for the Senate or other higher office in two years, including Rep. Mike Pence (Ind.), a potential GOP presidential hopeful. Check out the full roll call here.

Also voting against the compromise, which passed the House overwhelmingly Thursday, were Reps. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzDem demands documents from TSA after scathing security report Chaffetz replacement sworn in as House member Democrats expand House map after election victories MORE (R-Utah), Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.), Connie Mack (R-Fla.), Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannBachmann praises Trump as man of faith Tom Petty dies at 66 Bachmann: Muslim immigrants trying to undermine Western civilization MORE (R-Minn.) and Pete Hoekstra (R-Mich.).

Chaffetz is making noise about challenging Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchProminent conservative passes on Utah Senate bid Republicans offer this impossible choice: Tax cuts or senior care Senate GOP running out of options to stop Moore MORE (R-Utah) in a GOP primary in 2012. Hatch voted for the package in Wednesday's 81-19 Senate vote.

The votes against the measure, which is now headed to the president's desk, will likely be a positive with Tea Party activists and could help in a GOP primary.

Rehberg, Mack, Bachmann and Hoekstra are all mentioned as potential Senate candidates in 2012. Incumbent Democratic Sens. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBooker tries to find the right lane  Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns GOP tries to keep spotlight on taxes amid Mueller charges MORE (Mont.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonReport: FCC chair to push for complete repeal of net neutrality Collins: Pass bipartisan ObamaCare bills before mandate repeal Democrats scramble to contain Franken fallout  MORE (Fla.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharKlobuchar taking over Franken's sexual assault bill Tech beefs up lobbying amid Russia scrutiny Facebook wants 'flexibility' in political advertising regs MORE (Minn.) and Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowRep. Upton won't seek Michigan Senate seat, focuses on reelection The feds need to return to the original intent of foreign investment review GOP campaign committees call on Democrats to return Franken donations MORE (Mich.) all supported the package.

Though Republican leaders in the House and Senate supported the package, some conservatives have derided the compromise, taking issue with the way in which the extension of unemployment insurance benefits will be paid for. Conservatives who have wanted to eliminate the estate tax have also raised objections to that part of the deal.

Two other members who have been urged to run for the Senate by some Republicans in their home states — Reps. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) and Jeff FortenberryJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FortenberryWe vowed to help persecuted religious minorities — it’s time to act Kurds, Iraqi Christians want democracy for themselves Rep: Charlie Gard granted permanent residence status MORE (R-Neb.) — also voted against the compromise Thursday. But Jordan has all but ruled out a run against Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownScott Garrett poses real threat to EXIM Bank, small businesses Class warfare fight erupts over tax bills Senators Hatch, Brown have heated exchange on GOP tax plan MORE (D-Ohio) in 2012, and Fortenberry has shown little public interest so far in challenging Sen. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.).

One other interesting note: Rep. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerAnother perfect storm: Why we must act before flood insurance runs dry Senators introduce bipartisan gun background check bill Dem PAC bullish on Senate chances MORE (R-Nev.) voted for the tax deal in the House, breaking with Sen. John Ensign (Nev.), who was one of the few Republicans to vote against the compromise in the Senate.

Heller is a rumored Senate contender in 2012, and many think he's likely to run regardless of whether the scandal-plagued Ensign decides to seek another term.

Despite the uproar on the left over the deal, it passed the House with ease Thursday by a vote of 277-148, winning the votes of 139 House Democrats.

This story was updated at 9:03 a.m.