At least eight of the 36 GOP "no" votes came from members thought to be running for the Senate or other higher office in two years, including Rep. Mike Pence (Ind.), a potential GOP presidential hopeful. Check out the full roll call here.

Also voting against the compromise, which passed the House overwhelmingly Thursday, were Reps. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzHouse chairman criticizes FEMA’s Louisiana flood response Michael Moore: Town hall outcry 'makes the Tea Party look like preschool' Chaffetz probing national park's tweet welcoming new monument MORE (R-Utah), Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.), Connie Mack (R-Fla.), Michele BachmannMichele Bachmann'Real Housewives' producer 'begging' Conway to join cast Ex-rep admires furs amid PETA inaugural gala Why Republicans took aim at an ethics watchdog MORE (R-Minn.) and Pete Hoekstra (R-Mich.).

Chaffetz is making noise about challenging Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin HatchA guide to the committees: Senate 7 key players in the GOP's border tax fight Public lands dispute costs Utah a major trade show MORE (R-Utah) in a GOP primary in 2012. Hatch voted for the package in Wednesday's 81-19 Senate vote.

The votes against the measure, which is now headed to the president's desk, will likely be a positive with Tea Party activists and could help in a GOP primary.

Rehberg, Mack, Bachmann and Hoekstra are all mentioned as potential Senate candidates in 2012. Incumbent Democratic Sens. Max BaucusMax BaucusFive reasons why Tillerson is likely to get through Business groups express support for Branstad nomination The mysterious sealed opioid report fuels speculation MORE (Mont.), Bill NelsonBill NelsonA guide to the committees: Senate Senate advances Trump's Commerce pick CMS nominee breezes through confirmation hearing MORE (Fla.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharSanders, not Trump, is the real working-class hero A guide to the committees: Senate Drug importation from other countries will save dollars and lives MORE (Minn.) and Debbie StabenowDebbie StabenowA guide to the committees: Senate Trump's pick to lead Medicare won't say if she supports negotiating prices with drug companies Overnight Finance: Fed chief tries to stay above partisan fray | Bill would eliminate consumer agency | Trump signs repeal of SEC rule on foreign payments MORE (Mich.) all supported the package.

Though Republican leaders in the House and Senate supported the package, some conservatives have derided the compromise, taking issue with the way in which the extension of unemployment insurance benefits will be paid for. Conservatives who have wanted to eliminate the estate tax have also raised objections to that part of the deal.

Two other members who have been urged to run for the Senate by some Republicans in their home states — Reps. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) and Jeff FortenberryJeff FortenberryA guide to the committees: House WHIP LIST: Republicans breaking with Trump Pence rallies GOP before final stretch MORE (R-Neb.) — also voted against the compromise Thursday. But Jordan has all but ruled out a run against Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownSanders, not Trump, is the real working-class hero A guide to the committees: Senate House bill would prevent Trump from lifting Russian sanctions MORE (D-Ohio) in 2012, and Fortenberry has shown little public interest so far in challenging Sen. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.).

One other interesting note: Rep. Dean HellerDean HellerCornyn: Border wall 'makes absolutely no sense' in some areas Greens launch ads against two GOP senators for Pruitt votes GOP groups ramp up pressure on lawmakers over ObamaCare MORE (R-Nev.) voted for the tax deal in the House, breaking with Sen. John Ensign (Nev.), who was one of the few Republicans to vote against the compromise in the Senate.

Heller is a rumored Senate contender in 2012, and many think he's likely to run regardless of whether the scandal-plagued Ensign decides to seek another term.

Despite the uproar on the left over the deal, it passed the House with ease Thursday by a vote of 277-148, winning the votes of 139 House Democrats.

This story was updated at 9:03 a.m.