The committee went after Sens. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonElection security bill picks up new support in Senate Senators share their fascination with sharks at hearing Senate Dems build huge cash edge in battlegrounds MORE (Fla.), Ben Nelson (Neb.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump’s walk-back fails to stem outrage on Putin meeting Senate Dems build huge cash edge in battlegrounds Senate Dems lock in million in TV airtime MORE (Mo.), Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownTrump pick to face grilling over family separations On The Money: Commerce to review uranium imports | Lawmakers urge Trump not to impose auto tariffs | White House wants steeper cuts to EPA funding | Google hit with massive B fine Congress won’t stop Trump’s trade assault MORE (Ohio), Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowLobbying world The Hill's Morning Report — Trump, Putin meet under cloud of Mueller’s Russia indictments Dem senator: Kavanaugh sides with 'wealthiest special interests' MORE (Mich.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinElection Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas Senate Dems build huge cash edge in battlegrounds Morrisey accuses Manchin of 'lying' to Trump, attacks ‘liberal’ record MORE (W.Va.), Tester and Casey in news releases Monday. 

Ben Nelson, a top GOP target in 2012, expressed some disappointment Monday with the president's plan. In a statement, Nelson said the budget proposal "starts the debate about getting spending under control in Washington," but lamented that some of the largest reductions in the plan Obama said would reduce the deficit by $1 trillion over the next decade "arrive in the later years."  

Nelson said he intends to work with senators to "enact spending cuts that kick in sooner," but he didn't offer any detail on specific cuts.

Bill Nelson praised the budget proposal Monday, blasting critics whom he said "offer no real solution and really haven't done any cutting themselves."

"At least the president's budget is a step in the right direction in trying to get this country turned around, to really do something about lowering the deficit and cutting all of this wasteful spending," Nelson told the Bradenton Herald

Brown pointed the finger at Republicans, calling the proposal an effort to "clean up after years of reckless decisions that exacerbated our budget crisis," mentioning the Bush-era tax cuts and wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. 

"By not turing our backs on priorities that promote America's competitiveness — like education, innovation, infrastructure and energy — the proposal is forward-looking and responsible," said Brown.  

No reaction yet to the president's plan from McCaskill or Manchin, both top 2012 targets.  

McCaskill has been championing a plan, along with Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump’s damage control falters Trump says Russia doesn’t pose threat, contradicting intelligence director Fed Chair Powell's charm offensive touts a booming economy MORE (R-Tenn.), to enact a federal spending cap that she says will cut some $8 trillion from the deficit over the next decade.