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While this may open the door for some conservative Republicans to support the deal, Chocola pointed out that most of the congressmen his group supported in the last election said they would vote against Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerThe two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery One year later, neither party can get past last year's election White House strikes back at Bushes over legacy MORE's (R-Ohio) original debt-ceiling plan, and said he would be shocked if any of them vote for this version.

But Chocola said that while a vote for the plan wasn't necessarily damning in the group's eyes, a vote against the plan wouldn't earn some members sanctuary. 

"It's like with [Senator] Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchRead Senate GOP's tax bill Senate panel to start tax bill markup on Monday Senate set for clash with House on tax bill MORE [(R-Utah)] — he's voting to the right of Senator Jim DeMint [(R-S.C.)] these days," Chocola said, referring to the group's problems with Hatch's overall record, and DeMint's solidly conservative voting history. "I'm sure he'll vote no on this," he said. "But what we look at is the totality of their career."

Chocola called the bill a "relatively good deal" under normal circumstances, but that "when you relate it to the problem it doesn't do much good" and that the national debt has become such an overriding problem that the bill wouldn't achieve enough because some of its components were unenforceable. 

"They're asking us to trust them to do the right thing later, and Congress almost never does," he said. "It's not about the spending level and cuts level. ... It's about fundamental reform that starts to fix the problem."

Updated at 3:06 p.m.