Six of the eight House Republicans running for the Senate on Thursday voted against the budget deal from Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanRyan: CBO's healthcare estimate is 'bogus' Kushner speech to congressional interns delayed Overnight Energy: Exxon sues feds over M sanctions fine MORE (R-Wis.) and Sen. Patty MurrayPatty MurrayLawmakers send McCain well wishes after cancer diagnosis Trump labor board nominees advance in Senate Dems tout failure of GOP healthcare bill MORE (D-Wash.).

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Reps. Tom CottonTom CottonCruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power Overnight Finance: GOP offers measure to repeal arbitration rule | Feds fine Exxon M for Russian sanctions violations | Senate panel sticks with 2017 funding levels for budget | Trump tax nominee advances | Trump unveils first reg agenda Iran deal faces uncertain future under Trump MORE (R-Ark.) and Steve Daines (R-Mont.), top Republican Senate recruits who don't appear to face any threats in a primary, both voted against it, as did a trio of Georgia Republicans facing off in a crowded GOP primary: Reps. Paul BrounPaul BrounCalifornia lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner The Trail 2016: Let’s have another debate! MORE, Phil GingreyPhil GingreyBeating the drum on healthcare Former GOP chairman joins K Street Former Rep. Gingrey lands on K Street MORE and Jack Kingston.

Rep. Steve StockmanSteve StockmanFormer congressman indicted on conspiracy charges Ex-GOP rep blames arrest on 'deep state' conspiracy Former Texas rep Steve Stockman facing conspiracy charge MORE (R-Texas), who just announced a primary challenge to Sen. John CornynJohn CornynOvernight Healthcare: CBO predicts 22M would lose coverage under Senate ObamaCare replacement Rand Paul opens door to backing healthcare bill on key hurdle Cornyn: Knowing health plan ahead of vote is 'luxury we don't have' MORE (R-Texas), also voted against the bill.

Voting against the deal could help the candidates with the conservative base and with the Tea Party groups that vocally opposed it.

The only Republicans running for the Senate who backed the budget bill were Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), who is seeking to challenge Sen. Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuCNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' CNN's Van Jones: O'Keefe Russia 'nothingburger' video 'a hoax' Trump posts O'Keefe videos on Instagram MORE (D-La.), and Rep. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Moore CapitoOPINION | GOP healthcare attack is a vendetta against President Obama Cornyn: Knowing health plan ahead of vote is 'luxury we don't have' Conservative group to give GOP healthcare holdouts ‘Freedom Traitors Award’ MORE (R-W.Va.), running for an open seat.

The vast majority of House Republicans voted for the plan, handing a big win to both Ryan and Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerSudan sanctions spur intense lobbying OPINION | GOP's 7-year ObamaCare blood oath ends in failure A simple fix to encourage bipartisanship in the House MORE (R-Ohio).

The bill passed overwhelmingly, with 332 votes in favor, including 169 Republicans. Only 62 Republicans broke with party leaders and voted against it.

Daines, who's running for an open seat in Montana and is seen as closer to the establishment than the Tea Party, praised Ryan and Murray but said the deal relied too much on future cuts.

"While I'm encouraged by ongoing efforts to develop bipartisan proposals and commend Chairman Ryan and Chairman Murray for their work to find agreement, I am concerned that this budget proposal does not provide Montanans with a much-needed solution to our debt crisis," he said in a statement.

"Rather than taking serious and needed steps to address Washington's spending addiction and growing debt, this budget relies largely on spending cuts many years from now to offset immediate spending increases."

Cotton, a Tea Party favorite who is running against Sen. Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.), slammed the budget agreement.

"This budget deal busts the spending caps that took effect just months ago by spending billions now in exchange for supposed long-term spending cuts," he said in a statement. "Arkansans are tired of the Washington ‘long term,' which never seems to arrive."

Broun, a hard-charging conservative, was even more critical of the bill.

"Instead of taking the opportunity to enact meaningful spending reform, this deal spends an additional $63 billion over the next two years in exchange for the empty promise of spending cuts in the future — a budget gimmick which is all but certain to be cancelled before any real cuts come to fruition," he said in a statement.

"We must stop spending money we don’t have while kicking the tough decisions down the road."

Among Democrats running for the Senate, Reps. Gary Peters (D-Mich.) and Bruce BraleyBruce BraleyTen years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer Criminal sentencing bill tests McConnell-Grassley relationship MORE (D-Iowa) voted for the deal. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii), who is challenging Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) in a Democratic primary, was one of 32 Democrats to vote against it.