Vulnerable Senate Democrats appear poised to back the two-year budget deal approved by the House.

Sens. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichFormer Alaska senator jumps into governor race Overnight Energy: Trump directs Perry to stop coal plant closures | EPA spent ,560 on customized pens | EPA viewed postcard to Pruitt as a threat Perez creates advisory team for DNC transition MORE (Alaska) and Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuLandrieu dynasty faces a pause in Louisiana Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Project Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns MORE (La.), both red-state Democrats facing tough reelection fights, say they’ll support the bill when it comes up in the Senate next week.

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“I am encouraged that a budget agreement has been reached between the leaders so we can move past governing from crisis to crisis,” Landrieu said in a statement Thursday to The Hill. She told reporters on Friday she would vote for the bill.

Two other red-state Democrats facing tough reelection battles have yet to say how they’ll vote. Sen. Kay HaganKay Ruthven Hagan2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Politics is purple in North Carolina MORE’s (D-N.C.) office said she “is still reviewing the budget,” while Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE’s (D-Ark.) said he is “still looking it over.”

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidAmendments fuel resentments within Senate GOP Donald Trump is delivering on his promises and voters are noticing Danny Tarkanian wins Nevada GOP congressional primary MORE (D-Nev.) on Friday predicted Democrats would give the budget bill a strong show of support.

Asked if every Senate Democrat would vote for it, Reid said, "Yeah, we'll get our votes."

Voting for the bill appears to be a low-risk proposition for red-state Democrats following a big, bipartisan vote in the House, and supporting the plan could even help them in 2014.

Most of the vulnerable Democrats have sought to portray themselves as problem-solvers willing to work with the other side — and voting for a plan negotiated by Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanGeorge Will: Vote against GOP in midterms Trump tweet may doom House GOP effort on immigration On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump floats tariffs on European cars | Nikki Haley slams UN report on US poverty | Will tax law help GOP? It's a mystery MORE (R-Wis.) could give them a chance to prove it.

Two Democrats in the House who are running for open Senate seats have already voted for the bill. Reps. Bruce BraleyBruce Lowell BraleyOPINION | Tax reform, not Trump-McConnell feuds, will make 2018 a win for GOP Ten years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer MORE (D-Iowa) and Gary Peters (D-Mich.) backed the budget in Thursday’s House vote.
 
Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenDem senator: If Nielsen doesn't reunite families, 'she should resign' America will not forget about Pastor Andrew Brunson Shaheen sidelined after skin surgery MORE (D-N.H.), another Democrat who faces a potentially competitive reelection campaign, also plans to support the budget accord.

“Though the bipartisan budget bill isn’t the exact budget I would have crafted, I will support this measure because it represents the kind of compromise we need more of in Washington and will prevent another government shutdown,” she said in a statement to The Hill.

“Our most important priority right now ought to be jobs, and passing this budget will provide certainty for small businesses and boost economic growth.”

Passing the two-year budget also means Senate Democrats won’t face potentially tough votes on between now and the election.

Republicans in tough Senate races, on the other hand, are shunning the bill.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPolitical figures pay tribute to Charles Krauthammer Charles Krauthammer dies at the age of 68 Overnight Energy: EPA declines to write new rule for toxic spills | Senate blocks move to stop Obama water rule | EPA bought 'tactical' pants and polos MORE (R-Ky.) has said he’ll vote against it, as have a number of other Senate Republicans who are facing Tea Party primary opponents.

Six of the eight Republican House members running for the upper chamber opposed the legislation as well, including all who face serious primary challenges.

— Alexander Bolton contributed reporting.