The Republican National Committee is launching its first paid ads of the year this week, highlighting President Obama’s erroneous claim that Americans could keep their healthcare plans under ObamaCare.

The radio ads are New Year's themed and suggest listeners can keep their New Years’ “resolutions” of keeping Democratic lawmakers honest by “holding [them] accountable” for the claim, which was rated the “Lie of the Year” by PolitiFact.

“President Obama and [Senator/Representative] said if you like your insurance plan, you can keep it under ObamaCare. They lied to you,” the ad says.

“2014 is your chance to hold [Senator/Representative] accountable — tell them this is one New Year's resolution you’re sticking to,” it closes.

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Republicans see the claim, which was found to be erroneous late last year as thousands of Americans lost their insurance plans when ObamaCare took effect, as seriously damaging to Democrats — and have pledged to hammer vulnerable incumbents and candidates on it heading into the election.