RNC spends little on ObamaCare attacks

Republicans aren’t yet willing to put their money where their mouths are on ObamaCare attacks, it seems.

The Republican National Committee backed its new New Year's-themed radio ads with as little as $15 dollars in some districts.

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According to information from Democrats tracking media buys shared with The Hill, the RNC spent just $3,100 to air the radio ads on Tuesday and Wednesday across 36 markets, averaging less than $100 per market.

The RNC ads, which hit 12 Democratic incumbents and candidates, tie Democrats to President Obama’s erroneous claim that Americans could keep their health insurance under ObamaCare.

Against Rep. Nick RahallNick RahallWest Virginia is no longer Clinton country Solution needed: Rail congestion is stifling economic growth Lobbying World MORE (D-W.Va.), one of Democrats’ top vulnerable incumbents, the committee spent only $15. It spent another $115 to air the ad against Rep. Tim BishopTim BishopFlint residents hire first K Street firm House moves to vote on .1T package; backup plan in place GOP wants accountability, innovation from accreditation – at least right now MORE (D-N.Y.).

The RNC spent just $265 to air the ad in three markets against Rep. Gary Peters (D-Mich.), running for Senate there, and $580 to air the ad in six markets in Iowa, against Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce BraleyGOP group enlists public with opposition research app 10 rising stars in the energy and environment world DC delegate plans to confront GOP lawmaker calling for Washington recession MORE (D), another Senate candidate.

The ads also hit Sens. Mark BegichMark BegichEx-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Unable to ban Internet gambling, lawmakers try for moratorium Dem ex-lawmakers defend Schumer on Iran MORE (Alaska), Mark PryorMark PryorEx-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Top Democrats are no advocates for DC statehood Ex-Sen. Landrieu joins law and lobby firm MORE (Ark.), Mark UdallMark UdallEnergy issues roil race for Senate Unable to ban Internet gambling, lawmakers try for moratorium Two vulnerable senators lack challengers for 2016 MORE (Colo.), Mary LandrieuMary Landrieu oil is changing the world and Washington Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Republican announces bid for Vitter’s seat MORE (La.), Kay HaganKay Hagan10 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2016 Senate Republicans are feeling the 'Trump effect' Washington's lobby firms riding high MORE (N.C.), Jeanne Shaheen Jeanne ShaheenSenate fight brews over Afghan visas Senators to Obama: Make 'timely' call on Afghan troops levels Overnight Defense: Pentagon denies troops on Syrian front lines | Senators push for more Afghan visas MORE (N.H.), Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleySanders tests Wasserman Schultz Honor Frank Lautenberg by protecting our kids Dems discuss dropping Wasserman Schultz MORE (Ore.) and Mark WarnerMark WarnerNo time to relax: A digital security commission for the next generation Army posthumously awards female veteran who served as WWII spy The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (Va.). In some states, like New Hampshire and Oregon, the RNC only launched ads in one media market, an indication they likely spent little on the attacks in the less competitive states. 

It's not atypical for candidates and committees to launch low-dollar attacks early in the year, before voters seriously tune into political campaigns — but the low sum means their message is unlikely to hit many voters' ears at this point.

RNC spokeswoman Kirsten Kukowski dismissed questions concerning the size of the buy and suggested the ads were still hitting home.

“It’s funny, for all the talk about the size of the buy, the Democrats sure are reacting to our ads hitting them on ObamaCare,” she said.

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