Republicans aren’t yet willing to put their money where their mouths are on ObamaCare attacks, it seems.

The Republican National Committee backed its new New Year's-themed radio ads with as little as $15 dollars in some districts.

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According to information from Democrats tracking media buys shared with The Hill, the RNC spent just $3,100 to air the radio ads on Tuesday and Wednesday across 36 markets, averaging less than $100 per market.

The RNC ads, which hit 12 Democratic incumbents and candidates, tie Democrats to President Obama’s erroneous claim that Americans could keep their health insurance under ObamaCare.

Against Rep. Nick RahallNick Joe RahallWe shouldn't allow politics to impede disaster relief Break the cycle of partisanship with infant, child health care programs Clinton mulls role in 2018 midterms MORE (D-W.Va.), one of Democrats’ top vulnerable incumbents, the committee spent only $15. It spent another $115 to air the ad against Rep. Tim BishopTimothy (Tim) Howard BishopDems separated by 29 votes in NY House primary Flint residents hire first K Street firm House moves to vote on .1T package; backup plan in place MORE (D-N.Y.).

The RNC spent just $265 to air the ad in three markets against Rep. Gary Peters (D-Mich.), running for Senate there, and $580 to air the ad in six markets in Iowa, against Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce Lowell BraleyOPINION | Tax reform, not Trump-McConnell feuds, will make 2018 a win for GOP Ten years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer MORE (D), another Senate candidate.

The ads also hit Sens. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichFormer Alaska senator jumps into governor race Overnight Energy: Trump directs Perry to stop coal plant closures | EPA spent ,560 on customized pens | EPA viewed postcard to Pruitt as a threat Perez creates advisory team for DNC transition MORE (Alaska), Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.), Mark UdallMark Emery UdallSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Democratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups MORE (Colo.), Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuLandrieu dynasty faces a pause in Louisiana Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Project Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns MORE (La.), Kay HaganKay Ruthven Hagan2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Politics is purple in North Carolina MORE (N.C.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenAmerica will not forget about Pastor Andrew Brunson Shaheen sidelined after skin surgery Members of Congress demand new federal gender pay audit MORE (N.H.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Defiant Trump meets with House GOP amid border blowback Senate passes 6B defense bill Amnesty International rips family separation policy: 'This is nothing short of torture' MORE (Ore.) and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerWray defends FBI after 'sobering' watchdog report Top Dems: IG report shows Comey's actions helped Trump win election Dem senator: Trump at G-7 made me ‘embarrassed for our country’ MORE (Va.). In some states, like New Hampshire and Oregon, the RNC only launched ads in one media market, an indication they likely spent little on the attacks in the less competitive states. 

It's not atypical for candidates and committees to launch low-dollar attacks early in the year, before voters seriously tune into political campaigns — but the low sum means their message is unlikely to hit many voters' ears at this point.

RNC spokeswoman Kirsten Kukowski dismissed questions concerning the size of the buy and suggested the ads were still hitting home.

“It’s funny, for all the talk about the size of the buy, the Democrats sure are reacting to our ads hitting them on ObamaCare,” she said.