ObamaCare might create headaches for volunteer fire departments — and the National Republican Senatorial Committee wants to pin the blame on the Senate Democrats who voted for the law.

The NRSC will send out press releases later this morning slamming more than a dozen Democratic senators and candidates for backing the law, which they say is endangering volunteer fire departments.

"ObamaCare has been a disaster, and now volunteer firefighters and the communities that rely on them are the latest victims of Mark WarnerMark WarnerFive takeaways from a busy day of Russia hearings Senate Intel panel issues subpoenas to Flynn businesses Overnight Cybersecurity: Flynn refuses to comply with Senate subpoena | Chaffetz postpones hearing with Comey | Small biz cyber bill would cost M | New worm spotted after 'Wanna Cry' MORE's terrible law," said NRSC press secretary Brook Hougesen in the version of the upcoming release targeting Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.).

"Ninety percent of Virginia's fire departments are volunteer, and it is unfair and unfortunate that those firefighters and the communities they protect are the latest ObamaCare victims."

Volunteer firefighters are often classified as employees so they can get benefits like stipends, pensions and other perks. It's unclear whether that means they're counted under the law's requirement that employers with 50 or more full-time employees have to provide health insurance, which could prove prohibitively expensive for the frequently cash-strapped departments.

Many local departments' heads are concerned about what the law's impact will be, and some are working for a fix in the legislation, according to The Associated Press. Warner's office points out that he is involved in a bipartisan group of 11 senators pushing to address the issue.

Republicans are making ObamaCare's flaws a centerpiece of their 2014 election strategy, seeking to exploit specific concerns with the law.

The other Democratic senators targeted by the NRSC release are Sens. Mark BegichMark BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska), Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.), Mark UdallMark UdallPicking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' Election autopsy: Latinos favored Clinton more than exit polls showed MORE (Colo.), Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Five unanswered questions after Trump's upset victory Pavlich: O’Keefe a true journalist MORE (La.), Al FrankenAl FrankenAl Franken: 'Very decent chance' Trump will still be president at end of month GOP talks of narrowing ‘blue-slip’ rule for judges Chelsea Handler recalls run-in with Ivanka: 'I can’t even with you' MORE (Minn.), Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (N.C.), Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyRussia probes in limbo after special prosecutor announcement Special counsel appointment gets bipartisan praise Lawmakers unveil bill to combat Sessions' push for tougher sentences MORE (Ore.) and Jeanne Shaheen Jeanne ShaheenDem senator: 'One of our closest allies' expressed concern about intelligence sharing Sessions postpones Senate testimony on DOJ funding McConnell promises women can take part in healthcare meetings MORE (N.H.). The committee also attacks the Democratic Senate front-runners in Iowa, Michigan, Georgia, Kentucky, Montana, South Dakota and West Virginia.

— This post was updated at 10:20 a.m.