Perdue shows Senate rivals as crying babies

Georgia Senate candidate David Perdue (R) mocks his Republican Senate foes in a new campaign video, literally portraying them as crybabies.

Perdue's opponents are represented by crying infants, each one with a candidate's name on their T-shirt and diaper and a prop representing the candidate, to portray them as whining Washington insiders.

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"If you like the results coming out of Washington right now, then pick one of these four professional politicians. It really won't matter, because you know nothing will change. But if you're as outraged as I am by the size and scope of our government, by the amount of money they take from our pockets and by the inexcusable, childish behavior exhibited in Washington right now, then I hope you'll give this outsider from Georgia a chance," Perdue says in the video.

The babies representing Reps. Paul Broun (R-Ga.) and Phil Gingrey (R-Ga.), both doctors, have stethoscopes. Bespectacled Rep. Jack Kingston's (R-Ga.) baby holds glasses. Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel (R), the only woman in the primary, is represented by a baby wearing pearl earrings and necklace.

"Help me change the childish behavior up there. If we want different results in Washington, then we have to send a different type of person to Washington," Perdue continues near the end of the video.

The ad is produced by infamous Republican ad maker Fred Davis, who is known for his eye-catching and controversial commercials.

Davis's "Celebrity" ad for Sen. John McCain's (R-Ariz.) presidential campaign slamming then-candidate Barack Obama won plaudits. But some of his more recent ads have drawn ridicule, including Delaware Senate candidate Christine O'Donnell's (R) infamous "I'm not a witch" ad and California Senate candidate Carly Fiorina's (R) "Demon Sheep" ad in 2010, and a Michigan Senate ad from 2012 that many viewed as racist.

Much of the five-minute biographical Web video touts Perdue's business record, focusing on his work for Reebok, Sara Lee and Dollar General to paint him as a job creator and turnaround specialist. It also features former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue (R), his first cousin who is backing his campaign.

A Perdue spokesman says the video is being promoted online with paid web ads, and will provide fodder for future campaign commercials.

Perdue, a wealthy businessman, has trailed most of his opponents in the crowded field in early polling, though there's no clear front-runner, and his ability to spend heavily on the race could boost his chances.

Democrats are bullish about their chances at the seat and have touted former charity executive Michelle Nunn's (D) cross-party appeal in the conservative state.