New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) said Sunday that he doesn't think the GOP should back Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin's campaign, despite emerging support from several Republican senators.

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When asked on ABC's "This Week" if Akin should have the support of the GOP, Christie answered: "No. No I don't." Late last week, the Senate Conservatives Fund, led by Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), pledged $290,000 to Akin's embattled campaign.

Last month, Akin said that pregnancy rarely happens in cases of "legitimate rape" because women's bodies have a way of preventing conception.

Most recently, after their debate last week, Akin said incumbent Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillGovernment watchdog finds safety gaps in assisted living homes GOP Senate candidate fundraising lags behind Dems in key races McCaskill challenger links human trafficking to 'sexual revolution' of 1960s MORE (D) came out like a "wildcat" and characterized her behavior was more "ladylike" during her first Senate campaign in 2006.

Akin has apologized repeatedly for the first remark, while supporters and their funding made a quick retreat.

Still, in recent days, some Republicans have backed off their earlier criticism of Akin.

Akin has received support from DeMint's group, along with Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMcConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Overnight Tech: Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up hack | Apple considers battery rebates | Regulators talk bitcoin | SpaceX launches world's most powerful rocket Overnight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach MORE (R-S.C.) and Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnPaul Ryan should realize that federal earmarks are the currency of cronyism Republicans in Congress shouldn't try to bring back earmarks Republicans should know reviving earmarks is a political nightmare MORE (R-Okla.) as the focus has shifted to winning back the majority in the Senate.

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntHouse passes bill to ease menu labeling rules under ObamaCare Heroin Task Force presses Congress for more funding to fight opioid epidemic Senate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA MORE, a fellow Missouri Republican, also weighed in on the Akin race Sunday.

Walking back his initial assertion that Akin should "step aside," Blunt said Missouri voters will overlook Akin's divisive comments and choose him for the sake of denying Sen. Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTo end sugar subsidies, conservatives can't launch a frontal attack House presses Senate GOP on filibuster reform A pro-science approach to Yucca Mountain appropriations MORE (D-Nev.) and the Democrats a majority in the next Congress.

"At the end of the day, that race does largely become a debate about the majority in the Senate," Blunt said on CNN's "State of the Union" program.

"He [Akin] is on a ticket, at a time, when people are looking at a Senate that's not doing its work, and the only way to change the Senate is to change the majority of the Senate.

"It becomes a party race," Blunt added.

Appearing beside Blunt, Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley (D) had a decidedly different take. He said Akin "is going to lose because of [his] demonstrated anti-woman policy."

Last week, Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus said Akin was "absolutely" a better option than McCaskill.

"That's a given, and as chairman of the party, I have an obligation to make sure we win as many seats in the Senate as possible."