The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee is knocking Republicans for what they're calling the party's "recruiting nightmare" for Senate races, noting in a memo obtained by The Hill that Republicans faced a number of recruiting losses this week.

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“The recruiting nightmare continues to embarrass national Republicans with this week possibly being one of the worst yet after major failures in Colorado, Iowa, North Carolina, and Alaska, ” DSCC spokesman Justin Barasky said in the memo.

Even as Democrats struggle to find their own top-notch Senate talent in key states, the DSCC memo highlights serious Republican recruiting challenges in four states: Colorado, North Carolina, Iowa and Alaska.

In Colorado, Rep. Cory GardnerCory GardnerScarborough: Trump has chosen the 'wrong side' Moore, Strange advance in Alabama GOP primary GOP senator: Nazis should 'go back to their hole' MORE (R) opted against challenging Sen. Mark UdallMark UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (D), a choice that leaves the GOP without its strongest potential candidate and without any clear contenders for the seat. 

Udall has long been considered one of the safer incumbent Democratic senators, however, and Gardner looks more likely to challenge Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetNFL player points to Charlottesville after national anthem protest Trump quietly putting his stamp on the courts Overnight Energy: Senate begins moving energy nominations | Interior watchdog probing Zinke calls MORE (D) when he's up in 2016.

North Carolina Labor Commissioner Cherie Berry (R) decided not to run for Sen. Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE's (D) seat in 2014, eliminating what had been the GOP's top contender against the incumbent, according to a recent poll.

The Republican Party continues to search for its candidate in Iowa, after a number of potential contenders turned down the opportunity to challenge likely Democratic nominee Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce BraleyTen years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer Criminal sentencing bill tests McConnell-Grassley relationship MORE (D) for retiring Sen. Tom HarkinTom HarkinDistance education: Tumultuous today and yesterday Grassley challenger no stranger to defying odds Clinton ally stands between Sanders and chairmanship dream MORE's (D) seat.

On Wednesday, Iowa Secretary of State Matt Schultz also announced his decision not to run, leaving a handful of relatively unknown potential and declared candidates.

And in Alaska, former Senate candidate Joe Miller reportedly filed papers to run again in 2014. Miller defeated Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiFeds to sell 14 million barrels from oil reserve Immigration battlefield widens for Trump, GOP Trump barrage stuns McConnell and his allies MORE (R) in a 2010 primary but ultimately losing the general after she launched a successful write-in campaign. 

He is seen unfavorably by 49 percent of Alaskans, according to a recent Republican poll, and some Republicans worry he could undermine their chances at a winnable seat currently held by Democratic Sen. Mark BegichMark BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE.

“The NRSC and Karl Rove are failing in their promise to handpick candidates as they continue losing top recruits across the map. The past week alone is a perfect example of how the GOP’s inability to recruit electable candidates, expand the map, and avoid contentious primaries will plague their chances to take back the majority," Barasky adds.

Republican officials fired back at the Democratic claims the GOP is suffering from a chronic recruitment problem. 

"99.99% of Republicans in America aren't running for Senate next year, yet each time one confirms that reality, the clapping monkeys at the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee smash their cymbals," said National Republican Senatorial Committee spokeswoman Brook Hougesen.

"As far as Republican recruitment, in the post Citizens United world, it is far more important to do our due diligence and take the time to find right candidate than it is to rush through the process and fail as the Democrats have done."

Republicans largely agree that contentious primaries that resulted in weak candidates cost the GOP a number of winnable Senate seats last cycle, and the party pledged to make an extra effort to elect the most electable conservative candidates in 2014.

Democrats are facing a difficult 2014 map that will require them to defend more seats than Republicans — including a number in states that Mitt Romney won in 2012. But they are hoping that Republicans' early recruiting difficulties indicate the GOP is in for a replay of the 2012 cycle.

Democrats, meantime, have had recruiting difficulties of their own that could jeopardize their chances at defending seats in South Dakota and West Virginia, and of picking up a seat in Georgia.

Their top recruits passed on running in South Dakota and Georgia, and they have yet to front a candidate against Rep. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Moore CapitoNo. 2 Senate Republican backs McConnell in Trump fight The fight to protect the Affordable Care Act isn’t over Will Congress preserve monopoly power for healthcare lobbyists? MORE (R-W.Va.), considered the strongest GOP contender to run for retiring Sen. Jay RockefellerJay RockefellerOvernight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term Obama to preserve torture report in presidential papers MORE's (D-W.Va.) seat.

In Kentucky, too, Democrats have yet to find a candidate to run against Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellTrump’s isolation grows Ellison: Trump has 'level of sympathy' for neo-Nazis, white supremacists Trump touts endorsement of second-place finisher in Alabama primary MORE (R-Ky.).

According to numerous polls, McConnell is vulnerable heading into reelection. A handful of potential Democrats have turned down a run, however, and their top remaining recruit has yet to make a decision on the race, despite pressure from prominent local Democrats.

Hougesen noted the decisions of former Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (D) in South Dakota and Rep. John BarrowJohn BarrowOur democracy can’t afford to cut legal aid services from the budget Dem files Ethics complaint on Benghazi panel Barrow thanks staff in farewell speech MORE (D) in Georgia not to run as the "two biggest recruiting failures of the cycle," and said the GOP is simply taking its time in finding the best candidates.

—This post was updated at 2:06 p.m. and 4:28 p.m.