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According to local news site ColoradoPols.com, Republican strategists in the state are urging her to run in a race that currently lacks any likely GOP contenders.

Rep. Cory GardnerCory GardnerTrump applauds congressional allies as he kicks off inaugural festivities Overnight Tech: Tech listens for clues at Sessions hearing | EU weighs expanding privacy rule | Senators blast Backpage execs Overnight Tech: Trump meets Alibaba founder | Uber to make some data public | GOP Lawmakers tapped for key tech panels MORE's (R-Colo.) decision not to run, though expected, left the state party struggling to find a candidate to challenge Udall.

Stephens formerly worked for conservative group Focus on the Family lobbying on conservative issues, including abstinence education and anti-abortion-rights issues.

But she also drew the ire of some Tea Party supporters in the state when she sponsored a bill to create health insurance exchanges in Colorado, a key component of ObamaCare.

The purple tint of Colorado has given some Republicans hope they'd be able to mount a challenge against Udall in 2014, but he maintains high popularity in the state and has posted strong fundraising numbers so far this year, sitting on $2.5 million for his reelection fight at the close of the first quarter.