Most vulnerable senators back 'border surge' amendment

Sen. Mark PryorMark PryorEx-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Top Democrats are no advocates for DC statehood Ex-Sen. Landrieu joins law and lobby firm MORE (Ark.) and other vulnerable Senate Democrats up for reelection this year voted yes in a key test vote Monday on immigration reform.

Every Democrat present voted to advance a border security measure that was added to the underlying Senate bill.

Beesides Pryor, Sens. Mark BegichMark BegichEx-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Unable to ban Internet gambling, lawmakers try for moratorium Dem ex-lawmakers defend Schumer on Iran MORE (D-Alaska), Kay HaganKay Hagan10 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2016 Senate Republicans are feeling the 'Trump effect' Washington's lobby firms riding high MORE (D-N.C.) and Mary LandrieuMary Landrieu oil is changing the world and Washington Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Republican announces bid for Vitter’s seat MORE (D-La.) all supported the bill. Sen. Al FrankenAl FrankenConsumer internet privacy: Leaving the back door unlocked Senators unveil bill to overhaul apprenticeship programs Dems pressure Obama on vow to resettle 10,000 Syrian refugees MORE (D-Minn.), who is seen as less vulnerable, also voted yes.

ADVERTISEMENT
So did Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), who's likely to face a tough primary against Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii).

A number of swing- and blue-state Republicans who could face tough reelection battles in future years joined them

Sens. Mark KirkMark KirkFunding boost for TSA sails through committee GOP senators propose sending ISIS fighters to Gitmo VA chief 'deeply' regrets if Disney comment offended vets MORE (R-Ill.), Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteOvernight Defense: Pentagon chief fears sequestration's return Senate GOP ties Iran sanctions fight to defense bill VA secretary comes under fire for comparing wait times to Disneyland MORE (R-N.H.) and Dean HellerDean HellerLake Mead hits record low water level Tough choice for vulnerable GOP senators: Embrace or reject Trump Press: Forget about GOP unity in 2016 MORE (R-Nev.) were among the 15 Republican yes votes. Kirk and Ayotte are up for reelection in 2016, while Heller won't face the voters until 2018.

Some notable opponents: National Republican Senatorial Committee Chairman Jerry MoranJerry MoranGOP senators propose sending ISIS fighters to Gitmo Passing the Kelsey Smith Act will help law enforcement save lives Overnight Defense: VA chief 'deeply' regrets Disney remark; Senate fight brews over Gitmo MORE (R-Kans.), as well as both of his NRSC deputies, Sens. Rob PortmanRob PortmanJuan Williams: Electoral map looks grim for Trump McConnell touts 'Senate squad' in Wes Anderson-style video Liberal super-PAC hits Johnson for supporting Trump MORE (R-Ohio) and Ted CruzTed CruzFiorina returns to attack Clinton's 'lust for power' Trump clinches GOP nomination Eleven states sue Obama over transgender bathroom directive MORE (R-Texas).

Cruz has been a strident opponent of the bill, but Portman was viewed as a gettable vote for the amendment's advocates. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), who's likely to face a tough race in 2016, also voted against the amendment.

It’s unclear whether some of those who voted yes on Monday will vote no in a final vote later this week.

It’s also possible that some Republicans who voted no on Monday could reverse themselves later in the week. Voting no on Monday could allow some senators to retain leverage. Portman, for example, is pushing for language on immigration enforcement to be added to the bill.


More in Presidential races

GOP senator 'glad' Trump is 'walking back' Muslim ban

Read more »