Four Democratic senators facing tough reelection fights voted in favor of the immigration reform measure on Thursday afternoon, opening themselves up to likely attacks from conservatives heading into 2014 and beyond.

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Sen. Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.), a top GOP target in 2014, voted to advance the bill along with vulnerable Sens. Mark BegichMark BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (D-Alaska), Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (D-N.C.) and Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuCNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' CNN's Van Jones: O'Keefe Russia 'nothingburger' video 'a hoax' Trump posts O'Keefe videos on Instagram MORE (D-La.)  

Sen. Al FrankenAl FrankenOvernight Cybersecurity: Senate sends Russia sanctions bill to Trump | Senators unveil email privacy bill | Russia tried to spy on Macron with Facebook OPINION | Democrats: Time to wish Hillary Clinton good luck and goodbye Franken: ‘Constitutional crisis’ if Trump uses recess appointment to replace Sessions with someone who’ll fire Mueller MORE (D-Minn.), who is also up for reelection but considered less vulnerable, also voted for the bill. No Democrats voted against the legislation. 

A handful of Republicans in blue and swing states — some of who could see primary challenges — voted for passage.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamFour GOP senators threaten to block ‘skinny’ repeal Passing the DACA legislation will provide relief to children living in fear GOP senators: House agreeing to go to conference on ObamaCare repeal MORE (S.C.), up for reelection in 2014, voted for the bill. 

He has long faced criticism from conservatives for his record, though no primary challenger has yet emerged, and he's long been an outspoken supporter of reform. 

Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteOPINION: Democracy will send ISIS to the same grave as communism Kelly Ayotte joins defense contractor's board of directors Week ahead: Comey firing dominates Washington MORE (N.H.), Marco RubioMarco RubioMexican politicians have a new piñata: Donald Trump Bush ethics lawyer: Congress must tell Trump not to fire Mueller The private alternative to the National Flood Insurance Program  MORE (Fla.) aren't up for reelection until 2016, but their support for the reform measure is already causing consternation among conservatives.

Most notably, Tea Party leader Sarah Palin suggested the two should face primary challenges. 

And Rubio, who is seen as a probable 2016 contender, has seen his poll numbers drop in the past month, as debate over the bill intensified. 

Critics say his role in crafting and selling the measure to the public could hurt him with Republican primary voters and jeopardize his presidential aspirations.

Also up for reelection in 2016 is Sen. Mark KirkMark KirkMcConnell: Senate to try to repeal ObamaCare next week GOP senator: Not 'appropriate' to repeal ObamaCare without replacement GOP's repeal-only plan quickly collapses in Senate MORE (R-Ill.), whose vote for the bill could help him appeal to centrist voters in his blue state. 

Sen. Dean HellerDean HellerOvernight Cybersecurity: Senate sends Russia sanctions bill to Trump | Senators unveil email privacy bill | Russia tried to spy on Macron with Facebook Trump’s attacks stun Republican senators Bare-bones repeal plan gains steam in Senate MORE (R-Nev.), up in 2018 in a swing state, will also need to appeal to that voting bloc.

GOP debate over the bill has highlighted a split within the party on reform. Conservatives generally oppose what they say is a temporary stop-gap measure that does little to solve the problem and offers inadequate border security provisions. 

The no-votes from National Republican Senatorial Committee Chairman Jerry MoranJerry MoranSenate rejects ObamaCare repeal, replacement amendment Live coverage: Senate begins debate on ObamaCare repeal Senate healthcare bill appears headed for failure MORE (Kans.) and his NRSC deputies, Sens. Rob PortmanRob PortmanGOP senators: House agreeing to go to conference on ObamaCare repeal Key senator backs 'skinny' ObamaCare repeal The Memo: Justice Department veterans reeling over Sessions drama MORE (Ohio) and Ted CruzTed CruzTrump sounds like Pete Wilson — and that scares Calif. GOP Bare-bones repeal plan gains steam in Senate Dem lawmaker: Trump should fire Sessions MORE (Texas), underscore what a politically perilous issue immigration may be for some Republicans going forward.

In the House, a large contingent of far-right members have pledged to oppose the Senate measure.