Rep. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonThis week: Trump delivers State of the Union amid immigration fight Ingraham: White House yanked immigration plan defense from show After shutdown surrender, why should progressives ever trust Chuck Schumer again? MORE (R-Ark.) is seriously considering a run against Pryor. The first-term House member is a prodigious fundraiser popular with both the GOP's donor class and its Tea Party base. 

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National Republicans believe Pryor is the most vulnerable senator up for reelection this cycle.

Although his second-quarter fundraising haul is a significant dip from his $2 million first-quarter total, the earlier result was buoyed by a $1 million event with former President Clinton.

Begich, meanwhile, has now raised nearly $1 million for two consecutive quarters. 

He now has more than $2 million in the bank, money that will go far in Alaska's inexpensive advertising markets.

His seat, as well as Pryor’s, is among three or four up for grabs in 2014 that will determine which party controls the Senate.

Alaska Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell is the current front-runner for the GOP nomination and 2010 Republican Senate nominee Joe Miller (R) has also announced he is running. 

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R) has recently said she is considering a Senate run after hearing appeals from supporters to jump into the race. 

Among other Democrats facing reelection this cycle, Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganPolitics is purple in North Carolina Democrats can win North Carolina just like Jimmy Carter did in 1976 North Carolina will be a big battleground state in 2020 MORE (N.C.) and Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenOvernight Finance: Senators near two-year budget deal | Trump would 'love to see a shutdown' over immigration | Dow closes nearly 600 points higher after volatile day | Trade deficit at highest level since 2008 | Pawlenty leaving Wall Street group Pawlenty departing Wall Street group as campaign rumors swirl Bachmann won't run for Franken's Senate seat because she did not hear a 'call from God' MORE (Minn.) both brought in around $2 million in the second quarter.

Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuProject Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible CNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' MORE (La.) raised $1.7 million, Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerRegulators push for 'coordinated' approach to bitcoin trading House funding bill includes bipartisan Medicare reforms Overnight Tech: Mulvaney reportedly froze Equifax hack probe | Dems want new restrictions on Comcast-NBC | NJ gov signs net neutrality order | Senate confirms patent chief MORE (Va.) raised $1.4 million, Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (Colo.) raised $1.3 million and Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenSenators call for probe into US Olympic Committee, USA Gymnastics after abuse scandal Trump officials take heat for declining Russia sanctions Schumer to Trump administration: Who met with Putin's spy chief? MORE (N.H.) raised $1.2 million.

Democratic candidates making first-time Senate bids posted big numbers as well. Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce Lowell BraleyOPINION | Tax reform, not Trump-McConnell feuds, will make 2018 a win for GOP Ten years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer MORE (Iowa) brought in $1.25 million while Rep. Gary Peters (Mich.) raised $1 million. Both are expected to be their party’s nominees.

Republicans dismissed the significance of the Democrats' brisk fundraising. 

"Majorities on the verge of catastrophe have such hubris that they fool themselves into believing that money can solve all of their woes and electoral shortcomings, but ask Republicans how that turned out in 2006 or ex-Speaker Pelosi how it turned out in 2010," said National Republican Senatorial Committee spokesman Brad Dayspring. 

"The lone talking point left for Democrats is to throw money at the problem, but one look at the political graveyard shows that alone is failing strategy for a failing majority."