Rep. Tom CottonTom CottonTom Cotton rails against cable news countdown clocks GOP lawmakers call on FCC chair to soften data services proposal Trump should work with Congress to block regulations on prepaid cards MORE (R-Ark.) is seriously considering a run against Pryor. The first-term House member is a prodigious fundraiser popular with both the GOP's donor class and its Tea Party base. 

ADVERTISEMENT
National Republicans believe Pryor is the most vulnerable senator up for reelection this cycle.

Although his second-quarter fundraising haul is a significant dip from his $2 million first-quarter total, the earlier result was buoyed by a $1 million event with former President Clinton.

Begich, meanwhile, has now raised nearly $1 million for two consecutive quarters. 

He now has more than $2 million in the bank, money that will go far in Alaska's inexpensive advertising markets.

His seat, as well as Pryor’s, is among three or four up for grabs in 2014 that will determine which party controls the Senate.

Alaska Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell is the current front-runner for the GOP nomination and 2010 Republican Senate nominee Joe Miller (R) has also announced he is running. 

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R) has recently said she is considering a Senate run after hearing appeals from supporters to jump into the race. 

Among other Democrats facing reelection this cycle, Sens. Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (N.C.) and Al FrankenAl FrankenTwitter jumps on news of O'Reilly's ouster Senate Dems seek review of products linked to tax refunds House Democrat introduces bill to amend presidential removal procedures MORE (Minn.) both brought in around $2 million in the second quarter.

Sen. Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Five unanswered questions after Trump's upset victory Pavlich: O’Keefe a true journalist MORE (La.) raised $1.7 million, Sen. Mark WarnerMark WarnerSo what if banks push fancy cards? Give consumers the steak they want Five questions for the House's new Russia investigator Why an independent counsel is necessary in an election probe MORE (Va.) raised $1.4 million, Sen. Mark UdallMark UdallPicking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' Election autopsy: Latinos favored Clinton more than exit polls showed MORE (Colo.) raised $1.3 million and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen Jeanne ShaheenRussian interference looms over European elections Restore funding to United Nations Population Fund Senators urge Tillerson to meet with Russian opposition activists MORE (N.H.) raised $1.2 million.

Democratic candidates making first-time Senate bids posted big numbers as well. Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce BraleyTen years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer Criminal sentencing bill tests McConnell-Grassley relationship MORE (Iowa) brought in $1.25 million while Rep. Gary Peters (Mich.) raised $1 million. Both are expected to be their party’s nominees.

Republicans dismissed the significance of the Democrats' brisk fundraising. 

"Majorities on the verge of catastrophe have such hubris that they fool themselves into believing that money can solve all of their woes and electoral shortcomings, but ask Republicans how that turned out in 2006 or ex-Speaker Pelosi how it turned out in 2010," said National Republican Senatorial Committee spokesman Brad Dayspring. 

"The lone talking point left for Democrats is to throw money at the problem, but one look at the political graveyard shows that alone is failing strategy for a failing majority."