Rep. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonFCC moves forward with rule aimed at protecting US communications networks Longer sentences won’t stop the opioid epidemic Hillary foe turns heads with Trump talk MORE (R-Ark.) is seriously considering a run against Pryor. The first-term House member is a prodigious fundraiser popular with both the GOP's donor class and its Tea Party base. 

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National Republicans believe Pryor is the most vulnerable senator up for reelection this cycle.

Although his second-quarter fundraising haul is a significant dip from his $2 million first-quarter total, the earlier result was buoyed by a $1 million event with former President Clinton.

Begich, meanwhile, has now raised nearly $1 million for two consecutive quarters. 

He now has more than $2 million in the bank, money that will go far in Alaska's inexpensive advertising markets.

His seat, as well as Pryor’s, is among three or four up for grabs in 2014 that will determine which party controls the Senate.

Alaska Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell is the current front-runner for the GOP nomination and 2010 Republican Senate nominee Joe Miller (R) has also announced he is running. 

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R) has recently said she is considering a Senate run after hearing appeals from supporters to jump into the race. 

Among other Democrats facing reelection this cycle, Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven Hagan2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Politics is purple in North Carolina MORE (N.C.) and Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenWhy Smokin' Joe leads the pack of 2020 Democratic hopefuls Pawlenty to announce bid for Minnesota governor Al Franken: Sessions firing McCabe ‘is hypocrisy at its worst’ MORE (Minn.) both brought in around $2 million in the second quarter.

Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Project Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible MORE (La.) raised $1.7 million, Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerAmid struggle for votes, GOP plows ahead with Cabinet picks Overnight Cybersecurity: US, UK blame Russia for global cyberattacks | Top cyber official leaving White House | Zuckerberg to meet EU digital chief Senators, state officials to meet on election cybersecurity bill MORE (Va.) raised $1.4 million, Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery UdallSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Democratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups MORE (Colo.) raised $1.3 million and Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenMenendez rips characterization of Pompeo as 'nation's top diplomat' Dems give muted praise to Pompeo-Kim meeting Dem senators unveil expanded public option for health insurance MORE (N.H.) raised $1.2 million.

Democratic candidates making first-time Senate bids posted big numbers as well. Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce Lowell BraleyOPINION | Tax reform, not Trump-McConnell feuds, will make 2018 a win for GOP Ten years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer MORE (Iowa) brought in $1.25 million while Rep. Gary Peters (Mich.) raised $1 million. Both are expected to be their party’s nominees.

Republicans dismissed the significance of the Democrats' brisk fundraising. 

"Majorities on the verge of catastrophe have such hubris that they fool themselves into believing that money can solve all of their woes and electoral shortcomings, but ask Republicans how that turned out in 2006 or ex-Speaker Pelosi how it turned out in 2010," said National Republican Senatorial Committee spokesman Brad Dayspring. 

"The lone talking point left for Democrats is to throw money at the problem, but one look at the political graveyard shows that alone is failing strategy for a failing majority."