Rep. Tom CottonTom CottonPuerto Rico’s statehood win was a ruse House bill threatens Russia with nuclear treaty suspension Cotton: US policy should be regime change in Iran MORE (R-Ark.) is seriously considering a run against Pryor. The first-term House member is a prodigious fundraiser popular with both the GOP's donor class and its Tea Party base. 

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National Republicans believe Pryor is the most vulnerable senator up for reelection this cycle.

Although his second-quarter fundraising haul is a significant dip from his $2 million first-quarter total, the earlier result was buoyed by a $1 million event with former President Clinton.

Begich, meanwhile, has now raised nearly $1 million for two consecutive quarters. 

He now has more than $2 million in the bank, money that will go far in Alaska's inexpensive advertising markets.

His seat, as well as Pryor’s, is among three or four up for grabs in 2014 that will determine which party controls the Senate.

Alaska Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell is the current front-runner for the GOP nomination and 2010 Republican Senate nominee Joe Miller (R) has also announced he is running. 

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R) has recently said she is considering a Senate run after hearing appeals from supporters to jump into the race. 

Among other Democrats facing reelection this cycle, Sens. Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (N.C.) and Al FrankenAl FrankenOvernight Energy: EPA moves to repeal Obama water rule GOP senator calls for tight scrutiny on AT&T's proposed Time Warner merger Howard Stern: I have a 'man crush' on Al Franken MORE (Minn.) both brought in around $2 million in the second quarter.

Sen. Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuWhite House encourages viewing of anti-CNN James O'Keefe video New O’Keefe video shows CNN producer calling Russia coverage ‘mostly bull----’ GOP’s message on ObamaCare is us versus them MORE (La.) raised $1.7 million, Sen. Mark WarnerMark WarnerOvernight Finance: GOP divided over welfare cuts in budget | Lawmaker loses M on pharma stock he pitched | Yellen says another financial crisis unlikely in our lifetimes Overnight Cybersecurity: Obama faces new scrutiny for Russia response | UK parliament cyberattacked | Election hacking fears put heat on DHS | Feds appeal to Supreme Court over data warrants Election hacking fears turn heat on Homeland Security MORE (Va.) raised $1.4 million, Sen. Mark UdallMark UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (Colo.) raised $1.3 million and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen Jeanne ShaheenDems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity Senate overwhelmingly passes Russia sanctions deal Russia sanctions deal clears key Senate hurdle MORE (N.H.) raised $1.2 million.

Democratic candidates making first-time Senate bids posted big numbers as well. Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce BraleyTen years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer Criminal sentencing bill tests McConnell-Grassley relationship MORE (Iowa) brought in $1.25 million while Rep. Gary Peters (Mich.) raised $1 million. Both are expected to be their party’s nominees.

Republicans dismissed the significance of the Democrats' brisk fundraising. 

"Majorities on the verge of catastrophe have such hubris that they fool themselves into believing that money can solve all of their woes and electoral shortcomings, but ask Republicans how that turned out in 2006 or ex-Speaker Pelosi how it turned out in 2010," said National Republican Senatorial Committee spokesman Brad Dayspring. 

"The lone talking point left for Democrats is to throw money at the problem, but one look at the political graveyard shows that alone is failing strategy for a failing majority."