President Obama on Thursday signed a bill named for a Virginia girl who lobbied Congress to increase funding for medical research before dying last year at the age of 10.

The Gabriella Miller Kids First Research Act will dedicate $126 million to research over the next decade by eliminating public funding for presidential party conventions.

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At a singing ceremony in the Oval Office, Obama heralded Miller as "a beautiful, fun-loving, smart young lady" who "fought the good fight."

"What this legislation is going to do is it’s going to put millions of additional dollars into that research," Obama said.

"We’re going to need some cooperation from Congress to continue to work on a bipartisan basis to actually allocate those dollars in an effective way," he continued. "I know that [the National Institutes of Health] is very eager to work on these pediatric cancers, because obviously nothing is more challenging for a family than to go through something like this, and there’s more we can do for them."

The bill's co-sponsors, including House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorDave Brat's seat moved to 'toss-up' 4 years after upset victory over Eric Cantor The animating forces behind the Democratic Party are true, radical leftists Divided Democrats are in danger MORE (R-Va.) and Democratic Virginia Sens. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDem infighting erupts over Supreme Court pick Election Countdown: Latest on the 2018 Senate money race | Red-state Dems feeling the heat over Kavanaugh | Dem doubts about Warren | Ocasio-Cortez to visit Capitol Hill | Why Puerto Ricans in Florida could swing Senate race Green Day's 'American Idiot' climbs UK charts ahead of Trump visit MORE and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerRussians' indictment casts shadow ahead of Trump-Putin summit Top Senate Dem: Trump administration's lack of focus on election security an 'embarrassment' Dem senator: We need other Americans in the room with Trump, Putin MORE, were at the ceremony, along with Miller's brother and family. The president handed the pen he used to sign the bill to Gabriella's brother.

On Sunday, Cantor heralded the bill as an example of bipartisan cooperation during an interview with Fox News.

“This place can often be about politics,” Cantor said. “And what we’re trying to do is put the curing of disease for children above politics.”