The Obama administration will seek to avoid a vote in Congress on any nuclear deal with Iran, according to The New York Times.

“We wouldn’t seek congressional legislation in any comprehensive agreement for years,” one senior U.S. official told the Times

The U.S. and five world powers are negotiating with Iran over its nuclear program ahead of a Nov. 24 deadline. Any deal would likely include Iran cutting back its nuclear program in exchange for a loosening of U.S. sanctions. 

The Times reports that the Treasury Department has conducted a study concluding that President Obama can suspend the vast majority of sanctions without congressional approval. Permanently ending the sanctions would still require a vote from Congress.

Obama has already drawn fire from Republicans for bypassing Congress in other areas, and lawmakers on both sides have called for a vote to authorize U.S. strikes against ISIS.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynLawmakers feel pressure on guns Kasich’s campaign website tones down gun language after Florida shooting Murphy: Trump’s support for background check bill shows gun politics ‘shifting rapidly’ MORE (Texas), the Senate's No. 2 Republican, linked to the article on Twitter Monday and wrote, "This will not stand."

This move could anger Democrats as well. 

There is deep concern about a nuclear deal with Iran on both sides of the aisle in Congress, as lawmakers fear it would leave Iran too close to being able to make a nuclear weapon. 

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezJustice Dept intends to re-try Menendez in corruption case DACA is neither bipartisan nor in America's interest Senate DACA deal picks up GOP supporters MORE (D-N.J.) signaled that Congress would in fact weigh in. “If a potential deal does not substantially and effectively dismantle Iran’s illicit nuclear weapons program, I expect Congress will respond," he told the Times. "An agreement cannot allow Iran to be a threshold nuclear state.”

"Congress will not permit the president to unilaterally unravel Iran sanctions that passed the Senate in a 99-0 vote,” added Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (R-Ill.).

The administration says there would be an initial lifting of sanctions and that they would be reimposed if Iran failed to hold up its end of the agreement. 

National Security Council spokeswoman Bernadette Meehan told the Times there “is a role for Congress in our Iran policy,” but she did not seem to dispute the report that the administration would not initially seek a vote. 

— This story was updated at 9:19 a.m.