Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrJuan Williams: The shame of Trump's enablers Five takeaways from the social media hearings Overnight Tech: Senators demand tech firms do more on Russian meddling | House Intel releases Russian-promoted ads | Apple CEO says 'fake news' bigger threat than ads | Ex-Yahoo CEO, Equifax execs to testify on breaches MORE (R-N.C.) said Thursday that Republicans might not be able to pass an alternative to ObamaCare until 2017. 

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Burr, along with Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchRead Senate GOP's tax bill Senate panel to start tax bill markup on Monday Senate set for clash with House on tax bill MORE (R-Utah) and Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) unveiled a GOP replacement plan for ObamaCare on Wednesday. But, appearing the next evening on Fox News's "Special Report with Bret Baier," Burr said no single idea is likely to generate consensus.

"I don't think so," he said. "I think that there are going to be a lot of ideas not only in Congress but around the think tanks here in Washington and around the country."

He also pointed to the case of King v. Burwell, which the Supreme Court will hear next month. The high court could strike down subsidies to people buying insurance on ObamaCare's federally run exchanges, raising pressure for a response from Congress.

"But I do say this, we're going to know a lot more after the Supreme Court hears the King v. Burwell case, and that's going to be a short-term interim response," Burr said. "The long-term is, how do we revamp this in 2017 and after so it works for America's patients?"

Burr's plan would repeal ObamaCare and replace it with tax credits to help people buy insurance, while scrapping the law's mandates and protecting people with pre-existing conditions who have been continuously insured.  

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) announced last week that a different group of Republican lawmakers will also be developing an alternative. 

That group includes Reps. Paul RyanPaul RyanGOP rep: Virginia defeat 'a referendum' on Trump administration After Texas shooting, lawmakers question whether military has systemic reporting problem Pence: Praying 'takes nothing away' from trying to figure out causes behind mass shooting MORE (Wis.), John Kline (Minn.), and Upton. It will also create a "contingency plan" if the Supreme Court strikes down subsidies in King v. Burwell.