Reid: Hillary Clinton 'has a clear field' for 2016

Sen. Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTo end sugar subsidies, conservatives can't launch a frontal attack House presses Senate GOP on filibuster reform A pro-science approach to Yucca Mountain appropriations MORE (D-Nev.) says in an interview airing Friday that Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump touts report Warner attempted to talk to dossier author Poll: Nearly half of Iowans wouldn’t vote for Trump in 2020 Rubio on Warner contact with Russian lobbyist: It’s ‘had zero impact on our work’ MORE “has a clear field” to the Democratic presidential nomination, but the party lacks an “all-star” challenger like President Obama.

"Right now we have Hillary Clinton. And that's it," Reid says.

"There's not another Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaGOP lawmaker: Dems not standing for Trump is 'un-American' Forget the Nunes memo — where's the transparency with Trump’s personal finances? Mark Levin: Clinton colluded with Russia, 'paid for a warrant' to surveil Carter Page MORE out there. There are no all-stars out there," he says, based on a transcript of the interview set to air Friday on "The Rundown with José Díaz-Balart."

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The comments from Reid would appear to serve as a response to a Telemundo anchor who asked if there is any concern about a lack of debate among Democratic candidates. (The GOP field is much larger and growing.)

Clinton has big name recognition and is considered the heavy favorite for the nomination, despite a bid from Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersTrump has declared war on our climate — we won’t let him win Stock slide bites boastful Trump, but rising wages great for GOP Millions should march on DC to defeat Trump Republicans MORE (I-Vt.) and a likely bid from former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley (D).

Reid recounted in the epilogue to his autobiography, The Good Fight, how in early 2007 he encouraged Obama, then a freshman senator from Illinois, that "if you want to be president, you can be president now."

The Senate minority leader told MSNBC last year he thought it was "an extremely healthy process" for Obama and Clinton to challenge each other for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 campaign.

"Think how wonderful that primary was. Two all-stars. Two people that will be in the political hall of fame no matter what happens in the future, and they were involved in a primary," Reid said in his most recent interview.

Reid says he is "glad" Clinton has a clear field this time around, though.

“I am not a big fan of primaries,” Reid said last month, "I don't think they help, especially when you're someone as noted as Hillary.”

"I love Bernie Sanders," Reid said when asked about his colleague's place in the White House race. "Every place he goes he develops conversation. That doesn't hurt Hillary at all."