Reid: Hillary Clinton 'has a clear field' for 2016

Sen. Harry ReidHarry ReidHopes rise for law to expand access to experimental drugs If Gorsuch pick leads to 'crisis,' Dems should look in mirror first Senate confirms Mulvaney to be Trump’s budget chief MORE (D-Nev.) says in an interview airing Friday that Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonFederal judge denies watchdog's request to disclose State Dept. records on Clinton’s emails How Democrats can rebuild a winning, multiracial coalition Howard Dean endorses Buttigieg in DNC race MORE “has a clear field” to the Democratic presidential nomination, but the party lacks an “all-star” challenger like President Obama.

"Right now we have Hillary Clinton. And that's it," Reid says.

"There's not another Barack ObamaBarack ObamaHow Democrats can rebuild a winning, multiracial coalition Howard Dean endorses Buttigieg in DNC race Americans should get used to pop culture blending with politics MORE out there. There are no all-stars out there," he says, based on a transcript of the interview set to air Friday on "The Rundown with José Díaz-Balart."

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The comments from Reid would appear to serve as a response to a Telemundo anchor who asked if there is any concern about a lack of debate among Democratic candidates. (The GOP field is much larger and growing.)

Clinton has big name recognition and is considered the heavy favorite for the nomination, despite a bid from Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHoward Dean endorses Buttigieg in DNC race A guide to the committees: Senate Ellison holds edge in DNC race MORE (I-Vt.) and a likely bid from former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley (D).

Reid recounted in the epilogue to his autobiography, The Good Fight, how in early 2007 he encouraged Obama, then a freshman senator from Illinois, that "if you want to be president, you can be president now."

The Senate minority leader told MSNBC last year he thought it was "an extremely healthy process" for Obama and Clinton to challenge each other for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 campaign.

"Think how wonderful that primary was. Two all-stars. Two people that will be in the political hall of fame no matter what happens in the future, and they were involved in a primary," Reid said in his most recent interview.

Reid says he is "glad" Clinton has a clear field this time around, though.

“I am not a big fan of primaries,” Reid said last month, "I don't think they help, especially when you're someone as noted as Hillary.”

"I love Bernie Sanders," Reid said when asked about his colleague's place in the White House race. "Every place he goes he develops conversation. That doesn't hurt Hillary at all."