Reid: Hillary Clinton 'has a clear field' for 2016

Sen. Harry ReidHarry ReidObama’s November surprise This week: Shutdown deadline looms over Congress Week ahead: Spending fight shifts from Zika to Flint MORE (D-Nev.) says in an interview airing Friday that Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonPro-Clinton super PAC asks voters to #StopTheTrumpTrain in new ad Trump hits Clinton with 'Crooked Hillary' Snapchat filter ahead of debate Poll: Clinton, Trump in close race in Florida MORE “has a clear field” to the Democratic presidential nomination, but the party lacks an “all-star” challenger like President Obama.

"Right now we have Hillary Clinton. And that's it," Reid says.

"There's not another Barack ObamaBarack ObamaTrump's new debate challenge: Silence WATCH LIVE: Obama speaks at African American Museum opening Obama talks racial tension at African-American museum opening MORE out there. There are no all-stars out there," he says, based on a transcript of the interview set to air Friday on "The Rundown with José Díaz-Balart."

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The comments from Reid would appear to serve as a response to a Telemundo anchor who asked if there is any concern about a lack of debate among Democratic candidates. (The GOP field is much larger and growing.)

Clinton has big name recognition and is considered the heavy favorite for the nomination, despite a bid from Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDebate: Hillary must play for millennials, not wait for Trump to lose them Juan Williams: Verdict on big debate will be instantaneous Clinton, Sanders to campaign together in New Hampshire MORE (I-Vt.) and a likely bid from former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley (D).

Reid recounted in the epilogue to his autobiography, The Good Fight, how in early 2007 he encouraged Obama, then a freshman senator from Illinois, that "if you want to be president, you can be president now."

The Senate minority leader told MSNBC last year he thought it was "an extremely healthy process" for Obama and Clinton to challenge each other for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 campaign.

"Think how wonderful that primary was. Two all-stars. Two people that will be in the political hall of fame no matter what happens in the future, and they were involved in a primary," Reid said in his most recent interview.

Reid says he is "glad" Clinton has a clear field this time around, though.

“I am not a big fan of primaries,” Reid said last month, "I don't think they help, especially when you're someone as noted as Hillary.”

"I love Bernie Sanders," Reid said when asked about his colleague's place in the White House race. "Every place he goes he develops conversation. That doesn't hurt Hillary at all."