Obama: I won't negotiate on debt limit
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President Obama is pressing lawmakers to raise the federal debt ceiling and says he won't be drawn into negotiations.

"When it comes to the debt ceiling, we're not going back there," Obama said during a press conference in the State Dining Room of the White House on Friday.

His comments come after Treasury Secretary Jack LewJack LewWhite House divide may derail needed China trade reform 3 unconventional ways Trump can tackle the national debt One year later, the Iran nuclear deal is a success by any measure MORE set a Nov. 5 deadline on Thursday for raising the debt limit to avert a potential default on current loans. That gives Congress just a few weeks to hammer out an agreement on the current $18.1 trillion limit.

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Obama acknowledged that Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerLobbyists bounce back under Trump Business groups silent on Trump's Ex-Im nominee Chaffetz won't run for reelection MORE's (R-Ohio) plans to leave Congress in October will complicate budget negotiations with congressional leaders, but said he believed there is a path to an agreement.

"I do think there is still a path for us to come up with a reasonable agreement that raises the spending caps above sequester to make sure that we can properly finance both our defense and non-defense needs, that maintains a prudent control of our deficits and that we can do that in short order," Obama said.

"It's not that complicated. The math is the math," he added, saying he has spoken with BoehnerJohn BoehnerLobbyists bounce back under Trump Business groups silent on Trump's Ex-Im nominee Chaffetz won't run for reelection MORE, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellMcConnell warns Dems: No 'poison pills' in funding measure UN contacted Trump administration on ObamaCare repeal: report Congress nears deal on help for miners MORE (R-Ky.), Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidWeek ahead: House to revive Yucca Mountain fight Warren builds her brand with 2020 down the road 'Tuesday Group' turncoats must use recess to regroup on ObamaCare MORE (D-Nev.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).

Congress on Wednesday passed a short-term bill to keep the government funded through Dec. 11.

Obama said Friday that "extraneous issues" should be kept out of budget talks, mentioning the current fight over funding Planned Parenthood.

"You can't have an issue like that potentially wreck the entire U.S. economy, any more than I should hold the entire budget hostage to my desire to do something about gun violence," Obama said during the press conference, where he talked about gun control in the aftermath of Thursday's mass shooting at an Oregon college.

"There are some fights that we fight individually," Obama said.