Trump would move US Embassy to Jerusalem
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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump pens op-ed on kindergartners learning tech Bharara, Yates tamp down expectations Mueller will bring criminal charges Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax security employee left after breach | Lawmakers float bill to reform warrantless surveillance | Intel leaders keeping collusion probe open MORE says he would move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

That stance puts him in line with the Republican Party's conservative base but would break two decades of bipartisan White House policy. 

The GOP front-runner's addressed the issue Monday afternoon on CNN's "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer."

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When Blitzer, who started his journalism career in Israel, asked Trump if he'd move the embassy as president, the candidate said, "Yes, I would."

Trump shied away from providing a specific timeline for the action, referencing his upcoming Monday evening speech at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) annual conference.

Trump had previously balked at publicly declaring whether he'd back moving the U.S. Embassy when he spoke at a Republican Jewish Coalition event last year. 

The debate over recognizing Jerusalem has been a thorny issue in U.S.-Israel relations for decades. Both Israel and the Palestinians claim it as their capital city.

The U.S. still views it as an international city, in line with the United Nations, and says its status should be determined by negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians.

For years, there has been bipartisan support for legislation to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move the American embassy there from Tel Aviv.

But Presidents Bill ClintonBill ClintonAll five living former presidents to attend hurricane relief concert The Hill's 12:30 Report The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE, George W. Bush, and Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaAll five living former presidents to attend hurricane relief concert Overnight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Interior moves to delay Obama’s methane leak rule MORE have all asserted executive power to avoid carrying out that policy, arguing that remaining neutral on Jerusalem is imperative to America's national security interests.

GOP rivals Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWhatever you think the Alabama special election means, you’re probably wrong This week: Congress gets ball rolling on tax reform Week ahead: Senators work toward deal to fix ObamaCare markets MORE and John Kasich both side with Israel on the Jerusalem issue. Both Democratic candidates, Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Clip shows Larry David and Bernie Sanders reacting after discovering they're related For now, Trump dossier creates more questions than answers MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies DNC, RNC step up cyber protections Gun proposal picks up GOP support MORE, have not addressed it on the campaign trail.

In 2012, GOP nominee Mitt Romney called Jerusalem the capital of Israel and said he would move the embassy there if elected.

Updated at 5:41 p.m.