Trump would move US Embassy to Jerusalem
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Donald TrumpDonald TrumpTrump returns to White House after first trip abroad White House: Trump trip left no doubt 'who America’s friends are' Trump 'willing to deal well' with France, says Macron MORE says he would move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

That stance puts him in line with the Republican Party's conservative base but would break two decades of bipartisan White House policy. 

The GOP front-runner's addressed the issue Monday afternoon on CNN's "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer."

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When Blitzer, who started his journalism career in Israel, asked Trump if he'd move the embassy as president, the candidate said, "Yes, I would."

Trump shied away from providing a specific timeline for the action, referencing his upcoming Monday evening speech at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) annual conference.

Trump had previously balked at publicly declaring whether he'd back moving the U.S. Embassy when he spoke at a Republican Jewish Coalition event last year. 

The debate over recognizing Jerusalem has been a thorny issue in U.S.-Israel relations for decades. Both Israel and the Palestinians claim it as their capital city.

The U.S. still views it as an international city, in line with the United Nations, and says its status should be determined by negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians.

For years, there has been bipartisan support for legislation to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move the American embassy there from Tel Aviv.

But Presidents Bill ClintonBill ClintonLewandowski: 'I would clearly look at' White House job Washington needs high-level science and technology expertise – now! House lawmakers pitch ban on North Korean tourism MORE, George W. Bush, and Barack ObamaBarack ObamaObama visits Prince Harry at Kensington Palace White House to share info on ethics waivers White House considering vetting Trump’s tweets: report MORE have all asserted executive power to avoid carrying out that policy, arguing that remaining neutral on Jerusalem is imperative to America's national security interests.

GOP rivals Ted CruzTed CruzFranken explains why he made an exception to diss Cruz in his book FEC faults Cruz on Goldman Sachs loans in rare unanimous vote CBO score underlines GOP tensions on ObamaCare repeal MORE and John Kasich both side with Israel on the Jerusalem issue. Both Democratic candidates, Bernie SandersBernie SandersFunding confusion complicates Meals on Wheels budget fight The Hill's 12:30 Report Five takeaways from the Montana special election MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonHillary Clinton condemns 'racist abuse' in Portland attack Clinton returns to election night convention hall to talk about her new book Biden jabs at Trump in Cornell commencement speech MORE, have not addressed it on the campaign trail.

In 2012, GOP nominee Mitt Romney called Jerusalem the capital of Israel and said he would move the embassy there if elected.

Updated at 5:41 p.m.