Trump would move US Embassy to Jerusalem
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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpAssange meets U.S. congressman, vows to prove Russia did not leak him documents A history lesson on the Confederacy for President Trump GOP senator: Trump hasn't 'changed much' since campaign MORE says he would move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

That stance puts him in line with the Republican Party's conservative base but would break two decades of bipartisan White House policy. 

The GOP front-runner's addressed the issue Monday afternoon on CNN's "The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer."

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When Blitzer, who started his journalism career in Israel, asked Trump if he'd move the embassy as president, the candidate said, "Yes, I would."

Trump shied away from providing a specific timeline for the action, referencing his upcoming Monday evening speech at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) annual conference.

Trump had previously balked at publicly declaring whether he'd back moving the U.S. Embassy when he spoke at a Republican Jewish Coalition event last year. 

The debate over recognizing Jerusalem has been a thorny issue in U.S.-Israel relations for decades. Both Israel and the Palestinians claim it as their capital city.

The U.S. still views it as an international city, in line with the United Nations, and says its status should be determined by negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians.

For years, there has been bipartisan support for legislation to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital and move the American embassy there from Tel Aviv.

But Presidents Bill ClintonBill ClintonCongress needs to assert the war power against a dangerous president House Dems push to censure Trump over Charlottesville response Too many Americans with insurance are being denied coverage MORE, George W. Bush, and Barack ObamaBarack ObamaCongress needs to assert the war power against a dangerous president CNN's Don Lemon: Anyone supporting Trump ‘complicit' in racism DOJ warrant of Trump resistance site triggers alarm MORE have all asserted executive power to avoid carrying out that policy, arguing that remaining neutral on Jerusalem is imperative to America's national security interests.

GOP rivals Ted CruzTed CruzThe media couldn't be more blatant in distorting Trump's words on Charlottesville Curtis wins GOP primary for House seat vacated by Jason Chaffetz Kimmel: Let’s make Trump a king so he has no power MORE and John Kasich both side with Israel on the Jerusalem issue. Both Democratic candidates, Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersThe media couldn't be more blatant in distorting Trump's words on Charlottesville Road to renewable energy is filled with potholes of ‘magic thinking’ Bernie Sanders: Trump’s Charlottesville comments ‘embarrassing’ MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonAssange meets U.S. congressman, vows to prove Russia did not leak him documents High-ranking FBI official leaves Russia probe OPINION | Steve Bannon is Trump's indispensable man — don't sacrifice him to the critics MORE, have not addressed it on the campaign trail.

In 2012, GOP nominee Mitt Romney called Jerusalem the capital of Israel and said he would move the embassy there if elected.

Updated at 5:41 p.m.