Coons shares statute on lying to Congress after Trump Jr. testimony

Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsOvernight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach Hatch bill would dramatically increase H-1B visas Live coverage: Shutdown begins MORE (D-Del.) emailed the U.S. statute outlining punishments for lying or withholding information from Congress on Thursday just hours after Donald Trump Jr. testified before the committee.

"Below is a statue to keep in mind in regards to Donald Trump Jr.'s testimony today," Coons wrote in the email before sharing the rules of the statute.

"It is important to remember that anyone who testifies in front of a Senate committee is under the restrictions of the False Statements statute that says material false statements to Congress are criminal and punishable with fines or imprisonment or both," Coons said in a statement attached to the forwarded memo.

In a closed-door five-hour session with the committee, President TrumpDonald John TrumpTillerson: Russia already looking to interfere in 2018 midterms Dems pick up deep-red legislative seat in Missouri Speier on Trump's desire for military parade: 'We have a Napoleon in the making' MORE's son answered questions on his June 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer who promised information on Trump's Democratic opponent Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump touts report Warner attempted to talk to dossier author Poll: Nearly half of Iowans wouldn’t vote for Trump in 2020 Rubio on Warner contact with Russian lobbyist: It’s ‘had zero impact on our work’ MORE.

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Trump Jr. said in the session, which was not held under oath, that he was looking to assess Clinton's "fitness" for office. The testimony was part of the committee's ongoing investigation into Russian meddling in the election. 

The statute prohibits the falsifying or covering up of any material fact to Congress, and pertains to "procurement of property or services." 

Trump Jr. has become a key figure in the various Russia probes since the meeting was first reported. He has denied that he received any damaging information about Clinton after taking the meeting.