Coons shares statute on lying to Congress after Trump Jr. testimony

Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsAnti-Trump protesters hold candlelight vigil by White House Hillicon Valley: EU hits Google with record B fine | Trump tries to clarify Russia remarks | Sinclair changing deal to win over FCC | Election security bill gets traction | Robocall firm exposed voter data Overnight Defense: More Trump drama over Russia | Appeals court rules against Trump on transgender ban | Boeing wins Air Force One contract | Military parade to reportedly cost M MORE (D-Del.) emailed the U.S. statute outlining punishments for lying or withholding information from Congress on Thursday just hours after Donald Trump Jr. testified before the committee.

"Below is a statue to keep in mind in regards to Donald Trump Jr.'s testimony today," Coons wrote in the email before sharing the rules of the statute.

"It is important to remember that anyone who testifies in front of a Senate committee is under the restrictions of the False Statements statute that says material false statements to Congress are criminal and punishable with fines or imprisonment or both," Coons said in a statement attached to the forwarded memo.

In a closed-door five-hour session with the committee, President TrumpDonald John TrumpWSJ: Trump ignored advice to confront Putin over indictments Trump hotel charging Sean Spicer ,000 as book party venue Bernie Sanders: Trump 'so tough' on child separations but not on Putin MORE's son answered questions on his June 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer who promised information on Trump's Democratic opponent Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBernie Sanders: Trump 'so tough' on child separations but not on Putin Anti-Trump protests outside White House continue into fifth night Opera singers perform outside White House during fourth day of protests MORE.

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Trump Jr. said in the session, which was not held under oath, that he was looking to assess Clinton's "fitness" for office. The testimony was part of the committee's ongoing investigation into Russian meddling in the election. 

The statute prohibits the falsifying or covering up of any material fact to Congress, and pertains to "procurement of property or services." 

Trump Jr. has become a key figure in the various Russia probes since the meeting was first reported. He has denied that he received any damaging information about Clinton after taking the meeting.