Ben Sasse fires back at Hannity: 'Some of us still believe in the Constitution'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSasse: Republican Party ‘unpersuasive’ and vulnerable Senate GOP reveals different approach on tax reform Tax bill raises red flags for Senate GOP MORE (R-Neb.) fired back at Sean Hannity on Thursday after the Fox News host said he regretted supporting the senator, who has become a vocal critic of President Trump.

"Sorry, Sean -- you changed, not me. Some of us still believe in the Constitution," Sasse tweeted.

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Hannity criticized Sasse after the latter suggested Trump was in conflict with the First Amendment when he said this week that it is “disgusting the press is able to write whatever it wants to write.”

"No president should play with censoring news they dislike," Sasse tweeted.

"Question for conservatives: What will you wish you had said now if someday a President Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenCordray's legacy of consumer protection worth defending Booker tries to find the right lane  Jones raised 0K a day after first Moore accusers came forward: report MORE talks about censoring Fox News?" Sasse added in another tweet. The Massachusetts Democratic Senator is frequently suggested as a possible 2020 candidate.

"One of the biggest mistakes in my career was supporting @BenSasse. Just useless," Hannity tweeted after Sasse challenged Trump's criticism of unfavorable media coverage. 

Hannity is a consistent Trump supporter who reportedly speaks regularly with the president on the phone after his show and interviewed the president on Wednesday night.

Sasse originally challenged Trump on his allegiance to the First Amendment of the Constitution and its protection of a free press.

"Are you recanting of the Oath you took on Jan. 20 to preserve, protect, and defend the 1st Amendment?" he tweeted Wednesday night.

Trump this week said the government could challenge licensing for outlets that write what he calls "Fake News." Critics quickly raised concerns that Trump wanted to use the Federal Communications Commission to restrict the press, something the president denied.