Dallas Morning News: Cornyn ‘betrays’ GOP by backing Roy Moore
© Keren Carrion

The Dallas Morning News editorial board said Thursday that Sen. John CornynJohn CornynMcCarthy: ‘No deadline on DACA’ NSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Hoyer suggests Dems won't support spending bill without DACA fix MORE (R-Texas) "betrays" the GOP by backing controversial Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore, calling the decision a "new low." 

"Sen. John Cornyn’s endorsement this week of Roy Moore for the U.S. Senate from Alabama is a new low not just for the former jurist and ex-Texas attorney general, but for the party he claims to love," the paper wrote.

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The Dallas paper slammed Cornyn for what they said was a hypocritical endorsement of the candidate. In his endorsement, Cornyn said Moore would be "a tireless advocate led by principle rather than politics," despite the fact that the senator had previously criticized Moore for having twice been removed as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court.

"We had hoped, as many have, that Cornyn would stand against the tide of populist, nativist and exclusionary politics that have come to dominate the Republican Party in Texas and elsewhere. That hope has now been all but extinguished," the editorial board said. 

Republican Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWith religious liberty memo, Trump made America free to be faithful again Interstate compacts aren't the right way to fix occupational licensing laws Texas Dem: ‘I don’t know what to believe’ about what Trump wants for wall MORE (Texas) also came under fire from the newspaper, which claimed he fell short of his self-stated dedication to the Constitution by endorsing Moore. However, the paper acknowledged that Cruz has "built his career on putting himself at the front of a movement that seeks to destroy what used to be the mainstream wing of the Republican Party," the paper said. 

The Dallas Morning News accused Cornyn, long aligned with the establishment wing of the party, of bowing to pressure from Stephen Bannon in the decision to support an outsider candidate. Bannon is the former White House chief strategist and has vowed to support challengers to establishment GOP figures who don't align with President Trump's agenda. 

While Moore has won endorsements from other influential GOP senators such as Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulNSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Fix what we’ve got and make Medicare right this year Despite amnesty, DACA bill favors American wage-earners MORE (Ky.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeNSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle With religious liberty memo, Trump made America free to be faithful again This week: Time running out for Congress to avoid shutdown MORE (Utah), several conservatives in the party have also taken stances against Moore in the race for Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsSessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants DOJ wades into archdiocese fight for ads on DC buses Overnight Cybersecurity: Bipartisan bill aims to deter election interference | Russian hackers target Senate | House Intel panel subpoenas Bannon | DHS giving 'active defense' cyber tools to private sector MORE's vacant Senate seat.

Sens. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeMcCain rips Trump for attacks on press Bipartisan group to introduce DACA bill in House Flake's anti-Trump speech will make a lot of noise, but not much sense MORE (R-Ariz.) and Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseOvernight Cybersecurity: Bipartisan bill aims to deter election interference | Russian hackers target Senate | House Intel panel subpoenas Bannon | DHS giving 'active defense' cyber tools to private sector Interstate compacts aren't the right way to fix occupational licensing laws GOP senator demands briefing from Sessions after reports of Russian hackers targeting Senate MORE (R-Neb.) have both criticized Moore, pointing to his controversial stance against Muslims serving in Congress.

"What will remain of a Republican Party whose leaders are so desperate to preserve its power that they cozy up to a Senate candidate like Moore?" the Dallas Morning News said in the editorial. "Cornyn may find that soon enough the party he seeks to preserve will no longer be one he recognizes."