Trump’s defunct voter integrity commission won't hand over voter information
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpPoll: Both parties need to do more on drug prices Senate approves .3 trillion spending bill, sending to Trump White House: Trump will delay steel tariffs for EU, six countries MORE's defunct voter integrity commission is refusing to hand over to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) the voter data it had gathered from states during its brief existence.

A lawyer representing the commission, known as the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, said the group would not give the sensitive voter data to another agency, HuffPost reported. 


Trump dissolved the controversial panel on Wednesday, citing the failure of several states to hand over voter information. The request for state voter information was met with resistance last year, although 20 states did provide information on request.

Joseph Borson, a Department of Justice attorney representing the commission, responded to an emergency motion filed in federal court by the American Civil Liberties Union to block the commission from handing over the information it collected to DHS. He told the court the panel had no intention of doing so.

“We have additionally been authorized to represent that the data will not be transferred or utilized; thus, there is no basis for emergency injunctive relief," Borson said.

The panel last year requested names, addresses, birth dates and party affiliations of registered voters in each state. It also sought felony convictions, military statuses, the last four digits of Social Security numbers and voting records dating back to 2006.

The court filing adds to confusion over what happens next in Trump's goal to investigate his own claims of voter fraud in U.S. elections. 

"The better way to move forward would be to have the Department of Homeland Security do it within an executive branch agency rather than use the mechanism of a commission under the Federal Advisory Commission Act," the defunct panel's co-chair Kris Kobach told NPR on Thursday.