Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpConservatives express concern over House GOP immigration bill Poll: McSally holds 14-point lead in Arizona GOP Senate primary Trump defends Nielsen amid criticism over family separations MORE on Tuesday nominated the wife of former Sen. David VitterDavid Bruce VitterSenate panel advances Trump nominee who wouldn't say if Brown v. Board of Education was decided correctly Planned Parenthood targets judicial nominee over abortion comments Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge MORE (R-La.) to serve as a federal judge. 

The White House announced Trump's nomination of Wendy Vitter as U.S. district court judge for the Eastern District of Louisiana along with three other nominees for federal courts in Texas for confirmation by the Senate.

Vitter previously served as the general counsel for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans and managed her husband's House campaigns and assisted with his Senate bids.

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Both Louisiana Sens. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyOvernight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Trump officials move to expand non-ObamaCare health plans | 'Zero tolerance' policy stirs fears in health community | New ObamaCare repeal plan On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Markets roiled by Trump's new tariff threat | Trump lashes out at Canada over trade | Warren looks to block Trump pick for consumer agency 13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families MORE (R) and John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R) praised Vitter's nomination to be a federal judge on Tuesday.

Kennedy, who replaced Vitter's husband in the Senate, commended her "very important work as a prosecutor and as legal counsel" for the archdiocese.

Vitter was in the public spotlight in 2007 after her husband apologized for a "serious sin" after his number was linked to the "D.C. Madam" escort service.

"Like all marriages, ours is not perfect. None of us are. But we choose to work together as a family," she said at the time during a press conference with her husband.

David Vitter announced he would not seek reelection for the Louisiana seat after losing the state's gubernatorial runoff election in 2015. He works for a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying firm.