Avenatti says he's representing whistleblowers within ICE
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Attorney Michael Avenatti, who represents adult-film star Stormy Daniels in her lawsuits against President TrumpDonald John TrumpGillibrand urges opposition to Kavanaugh: Fight for abortion rights 'is now or never' Trump claims tariffs on foreign nations will rescue US steel industry: report Bannon announces pro-Trump movie, operation team ahead of midterms: report MORE, said Thursday that he's now representing whistleblowers within Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

"We are now representing whistleblowers within ICE, outside contractors, etc. They have reached out to us to provide us with info as to what is really going on," Avenatti tweeted. "We are going to blow this wide open and take the info to the American people so they can decide what happens next."

He did not provide specifics regarding the whistleblowers' allegations.

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Avenatti is representing Daniels in her lawsuit against Trump and his former attorney, Michael Cohen, over a nondisclosure agreement and subsequent payment related to an alleged 2006 affair.

He expanded his client base amid the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy on illegal immigration.

He has tweeted in recent days that he is representing parents who were separated from their children at the border as a result of that policy. He tweeted late Wednesday that he would visit a detention center in Phoenix to deliver letters to some of the children there.

"Looking forward to visiting detained children tmrw in Phoenix who were shipped there from Texas after being taken from their detained mothers (my clients)," Avenatti tweeted. "This will be their first 'contact' with their mothers in weeks. I will be delivering letters and messages of love and hope."

Amid pushback from Republicans, Democrats, current and former first ladies, and international officials, President Trump signed an executive order on Wednesday halting family separations. The decision came after he and other administration officials claimed for days that only Congress could address the issue.