Romney blasts ObamaCare as 'frustrating embarrassment'

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney blasted the rollout of ObamaCare as a "frustrating embarrassment" ahead of President Obama's trip to Massachusetts.

While in Boston, the president is expected to compare the rocky rollout of the ObamaCare enrollment website to the early days of Massachusetts's universal health care plan. He'll speak at Faneuil Hall — the 18th century marketplace where Romney, a former Massachusetts governor, signed his state's insurance law.

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A White House official said Tuesday the president was looking to “help set important perspective” about the state of the ObamaCare rollout, adding that the Massachusetts experience “offers important lessons for what we can expect.”

But in a statement issued Wednesday morning, Romney said that "had President Obama actually learned the lessons of Massachusetts health care, millions of Americans would not lose the insurance they were promised they could keep, millions more would not see their premiums skyrocket, and the installation of the program would not have been a frustrating embarrassment."

The White House has noted that only 123 Massachusetts residents signed up in the first month health plans were offered in their state.

“Today, 97 percent of Massachusetts residents have health insurance coverage and the primary attacks against this law — many of which we are hearing again today about the ACA — never proved true,” the official said.

But Romney said he still believed "the unique circumstances of a single state should not be grafted onto the entire nation" and reiterated that he thought states should individually handle healthcare reform efforts.

The White House said on Tuesday it had not reached out to the former Republican presidential candidate ahead of the event, which is slated to include current Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick (D), as well as state workers who help residents enroll in health coverage.

The presidential event also serves to counterbalance testimony by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Capitol Hill, the first time she has faced Republican questioning over early technical challenges with the website.