The immigration reform bill released early Wednesday morning by a bipartisan group of eight senators is more than 800 pages long.

The bill would create a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country, heighten border security and create guest-worker and high-skilled immigration programs.

It was released at 2 a.m. Wednesday by Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerConscience protections for health-care providers should be standard Pension committee must deliver on retirement promise Dem super PAC launches ad defending Donnelly on taxes MORE (D-N.Y.), one of four Democrats in the Gang of Eight, and it runs 844 pages long.

The measure faces a tough fight in Congress, with conservative Republicans expressing concern that lawmakers are rushing to pass immigration reform.

Early reports suggested that the bill could be as long as 1,500 pages.

“I’m for immigration reform, but we have 1,600 pages,” Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrump formally sends Pompeo nomination to Senate Spending bill delay raises risk of partial government shutdown support Overnight Defense: Senate sides with Trump on military role in Yemen | Dem vets push for new war authorization on Iraq anniversary | General says time isn't 'right' for space corps MORE (R-Ky.) had said. “We’re going to read the details and try to make it acceptable to conservatives.”

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio: McCabe 'should've been allowed to finish through the weekend' For Tillerson, bucking Trump became a job-killer At least six dead after pedestrian bridge collapses on cars in Florida MORE (R-Fla.) a member of the bipartisan group, defended the bill in a statement Wednesday.

"This bill marks the beginning of an important debate, and I believe it will fix our broken system by securing our borders, improving interior enforcement, modernizing our legal immigration to help create jobs and protect American workers, and dealing with our undocumented population in a tough but humane way that is fair to those trying to come here the right way and linked to achieving several security triggers," Rubio said.

He called the legislation a "strong conservative effort."

"While I believe this legislation is a strong conservative effort that will accomplish all these things and tries to make the best of the imperfect reality we face, it’s not perfect. But I am also confident that an open and transparent process that welcomes public input is going to make it even better," Rubio added.

President Obama on Tuesday hailed the bill as “largely consistent” with his own ideas for overhauling the nation’s immigration laws.

Schumer and Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump congratulated Putin after his national security team told him not to: report Trump faces backlash after congratulating Putin on election win McCain rips Trump's congratulatory call to Putin as an insult to Russian people MORE (R-Ariz.) met with Obama at the White House Tuesday and briefed him on the bill. Obama has made immigration reform a second-term priority and a separate group in the House is working on its own immigration bill.

Along with Schumer, McCain, and Rubio, Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSteyer brings his push to impeach Trump to town halls across the nation Trump formally sends Pompeo nomination to Senate GOP leaders to Trump: Leave Mueller alone MORE (R-S.C.), Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeSteyer brings his push to impeach Trump to town halls across the nation Flake: I'd back impeaching Trump if he fired Mueller 'without cause' Water has experienced a decade of bipartisan success MORE (R-Ariz.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinGOP leaders to Trump: Leave Mueller alone Water has experienced a decade of bipartisan success Trump vows tougher borders to fight opioid epidemic MORE (D-Ill.), Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezPoll: Menendez has 17-point lead over GOP challenger Russian attacks on America require bipartisan response from Congress Justice Dept intends to re-try Menendez in corruption case MORE (D-N.J.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand Bennet2020 Dems unify around assault weapons ban, putting pressure on colleagues McConnell, Schumer tap colleagues to explore budget reform Democrats march toward single-payer health care MORE (D-Colo.) round out the Gang of Eight.

The senators had intended to roll out their legislation earlier but delayed an event after the deadly terror attack in Boston on Monday. 

Read the bill below:

Gang of Eight immigration reform plan