Poll: Michelle Obama would be Hillary’s strongest Dem rival in 2016
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If Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaHeckler yells ‘Mr. President, f--- you’ as Trump arrives at Capitol Meghan McCain calls out Ivanka Trump for silence on family separation policy The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — Trump to meet House GOP as backlash to 'zero tolerance' policy grows MORE decided to run for president in 2016, she would pose the most significant threat, among likely contenders, to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonLewandowski says 'womp womp' at story of young girl being separated from mother at border Giuliani: FBI asked me about tease of a 'surprise' before election Republicans tear into IG finding on Clinton probe MORE's chances of winning the Democratic nomination, according to a new Rasmussen poll.

A telephone survey of 1,000 likely voters conducted by the polling company found that in a hypothetical match-up between the current first lady and the former secretary of State, Clinton would best Obama 56 percent to 22 percent.

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That may seem like a significant margin, but according to the most recent RealClearPolitics polling average, Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren on family separation policy: Trump is ‘taking America to a dark and ugly place’ Overnight Defense: States pull National Guard troops over family separation policy | Senators question pick for Afghan commander | US leaves UN Human Rights Council On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Markets roiled by Trump's new tariff threat | Trump lashes out at Canada over trade | Warren looks to block Trump pick for consumer agency MORE, a popular hypothetical challenger to Clinton, receives only 12.5 percent to Clinton's 64 percent.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersHeckler yells ‘Mr. President, f--- you’ as Trump arrives at Capitol Veteran New York Dems face upstart challengers Senate passes 6B defense bill MORE (I-Vt.), the only other major Democratic candidate in the race for president, is even further behind, with 7.4 percent. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, who is expected to announce his bid on May 30, fares the worst against Clinton, with 1.2 percent of support from likely voters.

The first lady is highly unlikely to mount a presidential campaign, however. In fact, of the people surveyed by Rasmussen, just 14 percent thought she should run.

Still, 40 percent of black voters welcomed the idea of her running, and she bests Clinton among those voters, with 44 percent support among African-Americans compared with 36 percent for Clinton.

Obama herself recently joked about a possible October surprise, hinting to "Late Show" host David Letterman that the thought had crossed her mind.