New GOP group poised to fall short of fundraising goal

A new Republican political group designed to help candidates in the midterm election is on track to fall well short of its fundraising target for this cycle. 

The organization, American Crossroads, set a goal of raising $52 million for the 2010 midterm cycle.

Former Bush deputy chief of staff Karl Rove and former Republican National Committee Chairman Ed Gillespie advise the group; it was launched with the hopes of rivaling big, outside groups, such as labor unions, which typically assist Democrats. 

But American Crossroads has raised $1.25 million since March and only brought in $200 last month, according to a monthly report filed Monday. The group has spent just over $140,000 in that time span. 

Democrats had already made plans to counter American Crossroads and other outside groups, forming their own organizations. 

"We're game but, frankly, we'll go as far as the Democratic and progressive donor community wants to take us," former Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee executive director Jim Jordan told the Washington Post earlier this month. "With our majorities in both houses in play — and with them President Obama's agenda — and talk of a hundred million dollars plus being raised by Republican independent groups, we're optimistic that our funding base will rally."

Still, the group has been active, launching a $120,000 ad campaign attacking Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.). The group also has plans to get involved with Senate races in several other states. 

Steven Law, the President and CEO of American Crossroads said he is not concerned about the low numbers. 

"We feel really comfortable about where we stand," he said. 

Law said that, over the last six weeks the group has spent time setting up an organization, hiring staff and building finance structure. 

"We ontinue to feel confident that we will hit our marks," he said, adding that he feels that June's report will be an improvement. 

American Crossroads is one of two new Republican groups with an eye on influencing this fall's contests, the other being the American Action Network. 

Law said that in addition to the Nevada race, the group will focus on Senate races in Colorado, Missouri, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Arkansas and Florida. 

"With each of those precisely what we would do in each state would be dependent on factors that they develop," Law said. 

This post was updated at 4:42 p.m.