A new e-mail validation system in the Senate will verify that all e-mails sent from Senate.gov addresses originate from legitimate — not "cloaked" — servers, the sergeant at arms announced Wednesday.

The system was implemented this week after news outlets received a series of false press releases saying that Sens. Patrick LeahyPatrick LeahyDems get it wrong: 'Originalism' is mainstream, even for liberal judges Live coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing Dems land few punches on Gorsuch MORE (D-Vt.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinDems get it wrong: 'Originalism' is mainstream, even for liberal judges Human rights leaders warn against confirming Gorsuch Feinstein sees slipping support among California voters: poll MORE (D-Calif.), Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) and Harry ReidHarry ReidThis obscure Senate rule could let VP Mike Pence fully repeal ObamaCare once and for all Sharron Angle to challenge GOP rep in Nevada Fox's Watters asks Trump whom he would fire: Baldwin, Schumer or Zucker MORE (D-Nev.) had died of cancer in their homes. 

Known as "sender policy framework" (SPF), the system “allows recipients’ e-mail systems to automatically check inbound messages to validate that they originated from a server authorized for the sender’s e-mail address,” according to an e-mail from the sergeant at arms to Senate administrators. 

The e-mail recommended that news media outlets use the SPF system to verify that e-mails received from Senate.gov addresses are legitimate. 

The four hoax e-mails — now under investigation by the U.S. Capitol Police — were modeled to look like blasts from the senators’ offices.