Republicans: Successful messaging driving party to 'solid gains' this fall

Republicans believe their messaging on voters' top concerns is priming them for "solid gains" in this fall's elections, according to a new RNC poll.

GOP candidates enjoy solid electoral indicators, pollster Whit Ayres wrote in a memo to the Republican National Committee (RNC), as well as an advantage over Democratic messaging on the economy, the deficit and national security issues.

"With less than 100 days to go until Election Day, a recent survey of likely voters conducted July 18-21 for the RNC shows that the environment is still ripe for solid Republican gains in November," Ayres wrote in a memo summarizing the results of a poll his firm had conducted for the RNC.

Ayres cited an enthusiasm advantage for Republicans, and said he found a 16-point advantage among independents for Republican candidates in a generic matchup against Democrats.

The GOP also benefits from their issues being more salient. Ayres said that "jobs and the economy" were voters' top issue, and urged Republican candidates to tie as many issues as possible to the economy.

"Other issues will certainly have a role in the campaign, but if candidates and surrogates are unable to discuss them in the context of their impact on 'jobs and the economy' then they risk the appearance of missing the point of the voters’ chief concern," the pollster wrote.

Ayres also advised Republicans to emphasize the need for "preventing tax hikes" and reining in spending, while running against bailouts and a "culture of Waste in Washington"

The memo said that, in a head-to-head matchup, Republican rhetoric was resonating more with independents than was Democrats' rhetoric.

56 percent of independents, the poll found, agreed with a Republican message about jobs, taxes and the stimulus, while 37 percent were inclined to agree that Democrats' signature stimulus had worked, and that it was the GOP who was only holding up more progress.

Ayres said he'll present the findings in full when RNC members meet in Kansas City, Mo., this month for a regular party meeting.