Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.) said he expects to move forward with new gun control legislation, despite the opposition of his party's leaders.

King, the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, said that most Republicans agree with his proposed legislation to outlaw bringing a firearm within 1,000 feet of a member of Congress.

"Yes, I expect to go forward, and it's not a disagreement I have with many people in the Republican Party," King said on Fox News.

Both Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerTrump's pick for Federal Reserve chief is right choice at right time The two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery One year later, neither party can get past last year's election MORE (R-Ohio) and House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorIf we want to make immigration great again, let's make it bipartisan Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns GOP Rep. Jeb Hensarling to retire after end of current term MORE (R-Va.) have said they oppose King's bill, which he proposed earlier this week following the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) at a constituent event.

King's bill is one of several proposed by members of both parties in the wake of the assassination attempt against Giffords. On the Republican side, Rep. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertColbert spoofs Louie Gohmert's Uranium One chart Social media reacts to Gohmert chart on Obama-era Uranium One deal GOP lawmaker calls for Mueller to be fired in speech on House floor MORE (R-Texas) has proposed allowing members to carry guns in D.C. and on the floor of the House. On the Democratic side, Rep. Robert Brady (Pa.) wants to outlaw language or images that threaten lawmakers, and several other lawmakers have proposed restrictions on the kind of extended magazine clips the alleged shooter used in the attack against Giffords.

The New York Republican argued that his legislation would give law enforcement greater leeway in preventing threats from manifesting against members of Congress at the kind of constituent event Giffords had been holding.

"So it's to, in effect, protect the people who are coming and also give the police the extra power they would need, so that if they do see someone with a gun or someone who might have a gun, they can go up and talk to them, question them, and escort them away," he said.