Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGun proposal picks up GOP support Children’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Dems see Trump as potential ally on gun reform MORE (R-Ky.) does not have a Democratic colleague to sit with during Tuesday's State of the Union.

Asked on ”Fox News Sunday” whether he will sit at the Republican leadership table during President Obama's speech, he said, “I'm going to sit where I usually sit.”

"We don't have seating assignments for most of our members. They can sit anywhere they want to," he added.

“More important than the appearance of sitting together is what we do together. And the American people are more interested in actual accomplishments on a bipartisan basis here in the next six to nine months than they are with the seating arrangement at the State of the Union,” he said.


Instead of sitting by party, many Democrats and Republicans have been pairing this year to show a spirit of bipartisanship after the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) two weeks ago.

Appearing on the same program, Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinGun proposal picks up GOP support Durbin: I had 'nothing to do' with Curbelo snub Republicans jockey for position on immigration MORE (D-Ill.) confirmed he will sit with Sen. Mark KirkMark KirkGiffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns Stale, misguided, divisive: minimum wage can't win elections Immigration critics find their champion in Trump MORE (R-Ill.) during the State of the Union.

On ABC's “This Week,” Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) said they did not have “dates” yet for the State of the Union.

On the program, Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) asked Hutchison if she would like to sit next to him. Her response was not broadcast on the show. 

On CBS' "Face the Nation," Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainRubio asks Army to kick out West Point grad with pro-communist posts The VA's woes cannot be pinned on any singular administration Overnight Defense: Mattis offers support for Iran deal | McCain blocks nominees over Afghanistan strategy | Trump, Tillerson spilt raises new questions about N. Korea policy MORE (R-Ariz.) said he's going to sit with Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallOvernight Energy: Trump temporarily lifts shipping restrictions for Puerto Rico relief New Mexico Gov: GOP health care bill 'still needs some work' Dems ask FEC to create new rules in response to Russian Facebook ads MORE (D-N.M.), while Sen. Mark UdallMark UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (D-Colo.), who came up with the mixed-seating idea and circulated a pledge among his colleagues, sits in McCain's usual seat.

"The fact is it's a good thing to do," McCain said. "Why not?"

Later on Sunday, Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyRepublicans jockey for position on immigration House clears bill to combat crimes against elderly Grassley: DACA deal wouldn't need border wall funding MORE (R-IA) tweeted that his "date" to the State of the Union will be Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHouse bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance Senate confirms No. 2 spot at HHS, days after Price resigns Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax CEO faces outraged lawmakers | Dem presses voting machine makers on cyber defense | Yahoo says 3 billion accounts affected by 2013 breach MORE (R-Ore.). Grassley noted that he was worked with Wyden to try to end the practice of secret Senate holds on nominations and legislation. "He invited," Grassley wrote.


Bridget Johnson contributed to this post. Post was updated at 2:27 pm.