Freshman Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRyan pledges 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Richard Gere welcomes lawmakers' words of support for Tibet Dem lawmaker gives McConnell's tax reform op-ed a failing grade MORE (R-Fla.) was elected with strong Tea Party support, but he is not sure that forming a Senate Tea Party Caucus is a good idea.

Rubio is not expected to attend the group's first meeting on Jan. 27, but he went further in a recent interview, saying that the caucus could co-opt the grassroots conservative movement. 

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"My concern is that politicians all of a sudden start co-opting the mantle of Tea Party. If all of a sudden being in the Tea Party is not something that is happening in Main Street, but rather something that’s happening in Washington D.C.," he said in an interview with the Shark Tank, a Florida political website. "The Tea Party all of a sudden becomes some sort of movement run by politicians. It’s gonna lose its effectiveness and I’m concerned about that."

Even though the Tea Party movement had a tremendous affect on Senate GOP primary races around the country, the Capitol Hill group has only three members committed to attending its first meeting: Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSupreme Court takes on same-sex wedding cake case House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama Trump really will shrink government, starting with national monuments MORE (R-Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLexington mayor launches bid for Congress Trump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics Meet the Iran hawk who could be Trump's next secretary of State MORE (R-Ky.) and Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) 

Other senators elected with the help of Tea Party activists, such as Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonOvernight Cybersecurity: Panel pushes agencies on dropping Kaspersky software | NC county won't pay ransom to hackers | Lawmakers sound alarm over ISIS 'cyber caliphate' GOP chairman warns of ISIS's ‘cyber caliphate’ Overnight Finance: House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama | GOP leaders to consider Dec. 30 spending bill | Justices skeptical of ban on sports betting | Mulvaney won't fire official who sued him MORE (R-Wis.) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) have also declined to join the caucus.

Rep. Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannJuan Williams: The GOP has divided America Bachmann praises Trump as man of faith Tom Petty dies at 66 MORE (R-Minn.) last year created a Tea Party Caucus in the House, which had nearly 30 members at the end of 2010.

But membership in the group might not become a litmus test for Republican lawmakers. Some conservative bloggers have echoed Rubio's concern about the caucus.

"When Representative Michele Bachmann spearheaded the Tea Party Caucus in the House, I had mixed emotions. When one person or a group of people claim to represent ideas, then the whole movement can be tainted by the missteps of the individual," Melissa Clouthier wrote at the conservative blog RedState in a post about Rubio's membership.

Rubio was an early underdog in the Florida Republican Senate primary behind Gov. Charlie Crist. But he eventually picked up momentum with the help of the Tea Party and drove Crist out of the race, and later the GOP. Rubio defeated Crist, who ran as an Independent, and Rep. Kendrick Meek (D) in the general election.

The Florida senator and conservative favorite said he would be joining the Senate Steering Committee, an existing group of conservative senators. 

"Why do we need something in addition to the steering committee?" Rubio asked. "And there maybe a good reason. I'm curious to hear about that."

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h/t Senatus