House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks Overnight Finance: Trump, lawmakers take key step to immigration deal | Trump urges Congress to bring back earmarks | Tax law poised to create windfall for states | Trump to attend Davos | Dimon walks back bitcoin criticism MORE (R-Ohio) said Tuesday that he "should be" considered a member of the Tea Party movement.

BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks Overnight Finance: Trump, lawmakers take key step to immigration deal | Trump urges Congress to bring back earmarks | Tax law poised to create windfall for states | Trump to attend Davos | Dimon walks back bitcoin criticism MORE, speaking on a Cincinnati radio affiliate, said he is a "big believer" in what the Tea Party stands for, and is in touch often with leaders of the grassroots, conservative movement.

"I should be," Boehner said on WLW radio when asked if he were a member of the Tea Party.

"I don't know if I actually pay dues, but I'm a big believer in the Tea Party," he added. "I talk to Tea Party activists all over my district and all over the country every day."

The top House Republican isn't a member of the official House Tea Party Caucus founded last year by Rep. Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannPawlenty opts out of Senate run in Minnesota US ambassador repeated debunked claim that Abedin has 'egregious' ties to Muslim Brotherhood Bachmann considering running for Franken's seat MORE (R-Minn.). His office said at the time that, as a personal policy, the Ohio Republican doesn't join any other caucuses other than the GOP Conference.

But if Boehner considers himself a part of the Tea Party movement, that hasn't absolved him of criticism from some of the members. He and other House GOP leaders have faced some mild criticism for not having been sufficiently aggressive on spending cuts, despite Boehner's promise that there's "no limit" to how much the House could cut from the budget.

Still, the spending for the rest of this fiscal year laid out by Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanGOP leaders pitch children's health funding in plan to avert shutdown Lawmakers see shutdown’s odds rising Fix what we’ve got and make Medicare right this year MORE (R-Wis.), which would cut $32 billion, falls short of the $100 billion in cuts that Republican leaders called for in their "Pledge to America."

Boehner has pledged an open amendment process that would allow additional amendments and deeper cuts, and on Tuesday he said he expected the GOP to surpass its commitment for $100 billion in cuts.

"We're going to meet our goal and meet our commitment," he said. "As a matter of fact, I would argue that we're going to far exceed what we promised the American people in terms of our willingness to cut spending."